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    A Tariff Cut Can Boost U.S. Output

    The Federal Reserve recently cut its forecast for economic growth in the United States. That’s a problem. We need higher growth to create jobs and rebuild a prosperous middle class. However, there’s a simple way the government could combat continued weak growth: eliminate tariffs on inputs used by U.S. producers. … More

    U.S., Japan Break Up Private-Sector Collusion

    The “largest criminal investigation the Antitrust Division has ever pursued” in its 80 years of existence is continuing to unfold. The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has just announced that an additional nine Japanese companies and two executives will plead guilty to price-fixing and bid-rigging targeted at auto parts sold … More

    Cooperation with Mexico: Key to Border Security and Stopping Transnational Crime

    According to recent reports, the U.S. is in talks with Mexico to strengthen security along Mexico’s southern border. The effort reportedly includes a three-level security system for Mexico’s border with Belize and Guatemala to stop human trafficking, drug running, and other gang-related activity. Stopping such activities is critical to not … More

    Indo–Pakistani Cease-Fire No More

    Indo–Pakistani skirmishing along the Line of Control (LoC) that divides Kashmir has escalated in the past 10 days and threatens to destroy a decade-old cease-fire between the regional rivals. A series of incidents along the LoC, including the ambush and killing of five Indian soldiers last week and the killing … More

    America Needs a New Balanced Tariff Structure

    Where does America get its shoes? Today, 99 percent of shoes sold in America come from overseas. Imported shoes are taxed at an average rate of 10 percent, with some tariffs as high as 67.5 percent. Inexpensive shoes are taxed at higher rates, a burden for low-income Americans. New Balance … More

    Expiration of Trade Preference Program Means Higher Prices

    On July 31, the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) expired. GSP is a program that waives tariffs on thousands of products that Americans import from developing countries. In 2012, the program reduced tariffs by $742 million. As House Ways and Means chairman Dave Camp (R–MI) observed, “GSP provides important benefits … More

    Imports: Let’s Hear More Economic Sense Like This from the President

    As President Obama heads to Chattanooga, Tennessee, today to give a speech at an Amazon.com fulfillment facility, he finally seems to be coming around on the positive effects that imports have on the economy. For a long time, the President failed to acknowledge that both exports and imports create jobs … More

    Dealing the Right Cards in Japan's Upper-House Shuffle

    On Sunday, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) took majority power in Japan’s upper house, giving his party majority control over both upper and lower houses. This presents an opportunity for the LDP to make the difficult changes necessary to turn its economy around and make it a … More

    “Everyday High Prices” Should Not Be Trade Agency’s Slogan

    Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade negotiations are taking place this week in Malaysia. Here’s a modest suggestion to help new U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman bring the TPP to a successful conclusion: eliminate the position of Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for Textiles, a job that places the welfare of one special … More

    China GDP Claims Don’t Matter

    China’s State Statistical Bureau (SSB) announced second-quarter real gross domestic product (GDP) growth at 7.5 percent and first-half real GDP at 7.6 percent. High or low, whether it meets the official target or not, no one should care. GDP is a poor indicator of economic health—anywhere. It is especially poor … More