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    PBS Constitutional Road Trip: Smooth Ride with a Few Bumps

    This week, PBS premiered part one of a four-part series on the Constitution. In it, Peter Sagal, host of NPR’s Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me, rode around America astride a decked-out flag motorcycle to investigate the Constitution in modern America. And the first leg of his journey was surprisingly good. … More

    Security and Liberty: How to Maximize Both

    The horrific terrorist attack in Boston this week, and the ensuing investigation to find the person or persons responsible, once again highlight the age-old question: How must America balance security and liberty? We at The Heritage Foundation cherish both individual liberty and security and have written about both before and … More

    Today at the Supreme Court: Same-Sex Marriage and California’s Proposition 8

    This morning, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Hollingsworth v. Perry, a constitutional challenge to California’s definition of marriage as the union of a man and woman. During the oral argument, both Justices Anthony Kennedy and Samuel Alito noted that same-sex marriage was a very recent experiment—just over a … More

    Marriage and Faux Federalism

    George Will opens his recent column criticizing the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) on federalism grounds by quoting from a 1948 Supreme Court case: “[U]nder the Constitution, the regulation and control of marital and family relationships are reserved to the States.” What he doesn’t point out is that the citation … More

    Ideology, Not Science, Behind Redefining Marriage

    Severe flaws and limitations exist in the scientific research into the relatively new phenomenon of same-sex parenting, argue preeminent political scientists Leon R. Kass and Harvey C. Mansfield in a brief filed with the Supreme Court by Nelson Lund. The scholars urge the Court not to redefine marriage based on … More

    The Arms Trade Treaty and the Second Amendment: The Dangers of Transnationalism

    On February 26, the American Bar Association’s (ABA) Center for Human Rights issued a white paper on the U.N. Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), which concludes that “the proposed ATT is consistent with the Second Amendment.” This conclusion neglects important facts about the treaty and the processes surrounding it, which we … More

    Portman: Right on the Court, Wrong on Marriage

    Senator Rob Portman (R–OH) announced this morning that he now supports the redefinition of marriage to include same-sex couples. He was clear, however, that the Supreme Court should not impose this redefinition. Americans and their elected officials have constitutional authority to make marriage policy. When Americans hear the case for … More

    Uniting Around the Constitution

    Budget cutters, cultural conservatives, and national defense hawks ought to be able to rally around a common standard. But what is that standard? In order to properly unite our forces, author Peter Berkowitz recommends that we must first temper our tempers. In his new book Constitutional Conservatism, Berkowitz writes that … More

    "Violence Against Women" Act: House Bill Better but Still Flawed

    The House has proposed its own reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). It is an improvement over the Senate bill, but it, too, suffers from constitutional problems. As discussed in a previous Heritage posting and in a recent law review article, if enacted into law, the Senate VAWA … More

    Frederick Douglass: America’s Valentine

    Valentine’s Day is the perfect day to eat chocolate or dote on freshly delivered red roses. Oh, and to celebrate the 19th-century abolitionist Frederick Douglass. Born into slavery on Maryland’s Eastern Shore in February 1818, Douglass was given the improbably dignified name “Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey.” Like many people born … More