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    Iraq Unravels in the Shadow of Syria’s Bloodbath

    Iraq, which has fallen out of the spotlight since the December 2011 U.S. troop withdrawal, has been plagued by rising internal conflict and instability. On Monday, al-Qaeda terrorists launched a brazen attack on two prisons near Baghdad and freed more than 500 prisoners. While the world’s attention has been focused … More

    EU Finally Begins to Take Hezbollah Threat Seriously

    Yesterday, the European Union finally reached the necessary consensus among its 28 member states to list Hezbollah’s “military wing” as a terrorist organization. The decision comes after many months of impasse and indecision, the byproduct of the EU’s required unanimity coupled with a concern among some European nations that the … More

    Q&A on Egypt

    Heritage expert James Jay Carafano, vice president of Foreign and Defense Policy Studies and the E. W. Richardson Fellow, gives his answers to questions about the turmoil in Egypt. Q. Is President Mohamed Morsi’s downfall a blow to democracy in the Middle East? A. No, far from it. Morsi was … More

    Syria: Would the U.N. ATT Ban U.S. Aid to the Rebels?

    Proponents of the U.N. Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) assert that the treaty prevents signatories from supporting not only the Syrian opposition but future rebellions against other totalitarian regimes. The Geneva Academy argues that the transfer of arms to a non-state actor “could amount to a violation” of the treaty. At … More

    Nuclear Reduction Plan Based on Assumptions, Not Reality

    President Obama’s speech in Berlin included a nuclear reduction pledge that is based on poor assumptions and an unrealistic goal. It is a policy that will leave the U.S. weaker as Russia continues its strategic arms buildup. Former Senator Jon Kyl (R–AZ) points out in a recent op-ed that Obama … More

    Turkish Protests Undermine Erdogan and His Foreign Policy

    Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has badly mishandled mushrooming protests, which could obstruct his political ambitions and constrain his latitude on foreign policy issues. The protests, which were initially triggered on May 28 by Erdogan’s plans to uproot trees in Gezi Park in Istanbul, quickly snowballed into nationwide anti-government … More

    “Russian Reset”: Time to Listen to the Critics

    In a well-reasoned broadside, The Washington Post’s editorial board blasted President Obama’s Russian policy and his Berlin speech this past Thursday. The editorial justly criticized the naiveté with which Obama reached out to Russian president Vladimir Putin with a badly thought out proposal to cut a third of the U.S. … More

    Syria and the G8: Only a Dinner Party Discussion

    The leaders of the G8 have wrapped up a two-day summit. Although tax, transparency, and trade (the so-called three Ts) were priorities on the official agenda, the civil war in Syria dominated the headlines. This change of plans demonstrates one of the biggest problems with huge international summits such as … More

    Obama Administration Backs into Policy of Arming Syrian Rebels

    The White House announced yesterday that President Obama has authorized the transfer of arms to Syria’s rebels after concluding that Bashar al-Assad’s regime had violated the president’s red line against the use of chemical weapons. The Obama Administration needed to reverse course and take stronger action in Syria to enforce … More

    Syria: Obama Administration Slow-Walks Decision on Chemical Weapons

    The Obama Administration has been moving very slowly on the Syrian chemical weapons issue. Caution is in order, because the President’s credibility is on the line. President Obama has repeatedly warned Bashar al-Assad’s regime not to use its huge chemical weapons arsenal. In a December speech he proclaimed, “The use … More