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  • spending reduction

    The RSC Budget: A First Look

    The Republican Study Committee (RSC) has proposed a budget that balances in just four years while holding tax revenue at near its historical average. It advances more aggressive entitlement reforms than the House Budget Committee plan, including Social Security, and features deeper spending cuts. Nevertheless, the plan also suffers weaknesses, … More

    Unused Federal Buildings: No Room for Sequestration Cuts?

    About 77,000 unused or underused federal buildings cost taxpayers $1.67 billion to operate and maintain in 2010 alone (latest data available), according to a Congressional Research Service (CRS) report from last year. Unlike your typical house on the market today, these buildings are beyond unsightly. The word derelict might not … More

    Sequestration: Much Larger Spending Cuts Needed to Balance the Budget

    Sequestration, the set of automatic spending reductions set to hit on March 1, barely makes a dent in federal spending over the next decade. Much larger spending cuts are needed to rein in growing spending and debt and avoid a debt crisis. Federal spending is projected to grow from $3.6 … More

    Morning Bell: What Will the Fiscal Cliff Deal Look Like?

    This week, President Obama and House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) have been trading secret offers on the fiscal cliff. Last night, they met for nearly an hour, and emerged with zipped lips about what progress—if any—they made on averting tax hikes across the board and automatic, deep budget cuts that … More

    Spending "War Savings" Is Still a Budget Gimmick

    During the first presidential debate, President Obama reiterated a policy proposal that barely holds water. His proposal to use so-called war savings from the troop drawdowns in Iraq and Afghanistan to pay for more domestic spending is nothing short of a budget gimmick. It would also justify continued federal spending … More

    The President's "Debt Reduction": $1.6 Trillion in Tax Hikes, Almost No Net Spending Reductions

    During his Rose Garden speech Monday, the President claimed that his new “debt reduction” plan would provide $2 of spending cuts for every $1 of tax increases. A closer look at the administration’s own numbers, however, suggests the President, well, exaggerated. A realistic assessment—based mainly on table S-6 of the … More