• The Heritage Network
    • Resize:
    • A
    • A
    • A
  • Donate
  • nuclear triad

    Americans Spend More on Pets Than on Nuclear Weapons

    A Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report released last week estimates that the cost of nuclear forces for 2014–2023 will be $355 billion—an average of $39.4 billion a year. Nuclear forces are essential for U.S. national security, which makes this investment negligible; indeed, Americans spend much more on their pets. The … More

    Administration Plans to Cut ICBMs

    The Washington Free Beacon reports that an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) squadron may be eliminated if the Obama Administration’s draft plan to cut it is implemented. Neither the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START) nor any other treaty would compel the Administration to make this move. And it could … More

    Budget Cuts Undermine 21st-Century Bomber, Threaten Nuclear Triad

    The Air Force’s new Long-Range Strike Bomber (LRS-B) can evade most high-tech air defenses, but it’s having a tough time escaping the military’s budget woes. If it can’t avoid cuts, this key component in the nuclear triad—and national security—will be compromised. At $550 million per aircraft, the LRS-B is much … More

    Making the Case for a Complete Nuclear Triad

    As Russia revitalizes its nuclear arsenal and rogue nations North Korea and Iran pursue nuclear capability, America’s nuclear triad is critical to national security. However, opponents of the triad argue that it is a Cold War relic that has become too expensive and that deterrence can still be achieved by … More

    Minimum Deterrence: Examining the Evidence

    The minimum deterrence posture, based on the premise that few nuclear weapons deter all adversaries, is unsubstantiated by historical evidence and contrary to vital U.S. national security interests, according to a new report by the National Institute for Public Policy (NIPP). NIPP president Keith Payne, NIPP senior scholar Ambassador Robert … More

    China Rising, U.S. Sinking Without Subs

    Tomorrow, the House Armed Services Seapower and Projection Forces Subcommittee will hold a hearing titled “Undersea Warfare Capabilities and Challenges.” As the Navy and Congress work to preserve the fleet amidst budget cuts and submarine buildups in China and Russia, here are some issues to consider. Ohio-Class Replacement The Ohio-class … More

    Nuclear Reduction Plan Based on Assumptions, Not Reality

    President Obama’s speech in Berlin included a nuclear reduction pledge that is based on poor assumptions and an unrealistic goal. It is a policy that will leave the U.S. weaker as Russia continues its strategic arms buildup. Former Senator Jon Kyl (R–AZ) points out in a recent op-ed that Obama … More

    House Pushes Back on Obama’s Nuclear Disarmament Agenda

    The House Armed Services Committee’s (HASC) National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) advances U.S. national interests when it comes to U.S. nuclear weapons. The bill prohibits elimination of the nuclear triad and limits availability of funds for further nuclear reductions. The President’s previous arms control treaty, the New Strategic Arms Reduction … More

    ICBMs Continue to Be an Important National Security Asset

    The U.S. Air Force recently stripped 17 officers of their authority to control and launch intercontinental-range ballistic missiles (ICBMs) after inspections indentified potential problems that could endanger U.S. national security. Although the incident did not impact security and operational readiness of U.S. ICBM forces, the Air Force is right to … More

    Obama Suddenly Cares About the Military When It Serves His Interest

    President Obama visited Newport News Shipyard yesterday—the largest naval shipbuilding facility in the world—to warn of sequestration’s effects on the U.S. Navy. Yet throughout his first term as Commander in Chief, he did nothing to stop the shrinking fleet. While the Administration has recently attempted to sound the alarm on … More