• The Heritage Network
    • Resize:
    • A
    • A
    • A
  • Donate
  • nuclear arsenal

    The U.S. Should Stop Favoring Russia on Nuclear Weapons

    This week marks the 4th anniversary of the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START) with Russia. Given the abject failure of this treaty, it seems appropriate that the administration chose this week to release its equally misguided plan for U.S. strategic force structure. Even before the ink on the … More

    The Complexities of the Nuclear Weapons Landscape

    Two recently released government reports show that the worldwide nuclear threat is getting more complex and more dangerous. The Defense Science Board (DSB) report shows how hard it can be to develop plans for even monitoring the nuclear landscape. For starters, the nuclear landscape is changing all the time: The … More

    Making the Case for a Complete Nuclear Triad

    As Russia revitalizes its nuclear arsenal and rogue nations North Korea and Iran pursue nuclear capability, America’s nuclear triad is critical to national security. However, opponents of the triad argue that it is a Cold War relic that has become too expensive and that deterrence can still be achieved by … More

    U.S. Nuclear Weapons Relevant for Today’s World

    U.S. nuclear weapons remain relevant for the security challenges the U.S. faces after the end of the Cold War, writes Georgetown’s Matthew Kroenig in his article “Think Again: American Nuclear Disarmament.” “Nostalgia for simpler times can be seductive,” he says, “but the United States needs a nuclear force that can … More

    Pakistan Threat Growing

    Yesterday’s revelation in The Washington Post about the large portion of the U.S. intelligence budget going toward collection efforts on Pakistan is not surprising. What is surprising is that that the Obama Administration publicly downplays the terrorist threat that continues to emanate from the Afghanistan–Pakistan region. According to the article, … More

    Why Ignoring Russian Arms Cheating Leaves the United States Vulnerable

    The Obama Administration appears to be ignoring Russian violations of arms control agreements in favor of securing future agreements, which will eventually leave the United States vulnerable to Russia’s growing intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) capabilities. In a recent article, Mark Schneider of the National Institute for Public Policy points out … More

    Reduced Nuclear Arms: Slimmer, but Not Smarter

    Would reducing U.S. nuclear arms save taxpayers money? Former Pentagon policy official David J. Trachtenberg responded to Stimson Center co-founder Barry Blechman’s piece arguing that it would. Trachtenberg points out that the money saved by reducing the nuclear stockpile is “negligible compared to the costs of building up [the] conventional … More

    Russia Compliance Problem: How Obama's Policy Is Failing

    In a recent article, Mark Schneider of the National Institute for Public Policy points out that Russia’s compliance issues with arms control treaties have worsened under Vladimir Putin. In 2007, Russia tested a multiple-warhead version of the SS-27 Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) despite a Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) provision … More

    Iran, North Korea Pose Greater Nuclear Threat Than Russia

    Iran’s nuclear energy chief, Fereydoun Abbasi-Davani, declared Friday that the country will continue uranium enrichment for energy, though most outsiders suspect it will be used for nuclear weapons. Even more troubling, this news comes directly after President Obama’s declaration in Germany that he wants further reductions in the U.S. nuclear … More

    Russia’s Advantage: No Reason to Follow Obama’s Lead in Nuclear Arms Reductions

    After President Obama made another pledge to reduce nuclear arms in Berlin last week, the underlying message seems to be that, if the United States continues marching down the road toward nuclear zero, other nuclear nations such as Russia will follow suit. Ironically, this policy depends on American influence while … More