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    Congress Needs to Hit the 'Reset' Button on Public Diplomancy

    George Kennan knew a thing or two about how nations treat one another. In 1946, while serving as deputy chief of the U.S. mission in Moscow, he penned “the long telegram.” That assessment of what motivated the Soviet Union shaped U.S. policy toward Moscow for decades. Later, at the new … More

    Five Ways Obama's Foreign Policies Have Failed

    On a Moscow train platform, two men smoke and swap rumors in the frozen evening air. “I hear they’ve raised the Russian flag in Donetsk?” one says. “I hear Crimea, too.” So reports freelance journalist Noah Sneider in Slate. As Russian troops hoisted their flag over Crimea, President Obama’s highly … More

    Author of Russian Reset Admits Policy Is Dead

    President Obama’s former Ambassador to Russia and self-described author of the Russian reset policy Michael McFaul today admitted the obvious: the reset is dead. In a radio interview with the Flint Report in Montana, McFaul stated, “The reset ended, the reset ended a long time ago.” McFaul is correct that … More

    5 Reasons Why We're Not in Danger of Another Cold War

    At a press conference in the Hague, President Obama dismissed the suggestion that Mitt Romney had been right in 2012 to peg Moscow as America’s top strategic challenge. “The truth of the matter is that America’s got a whole lot of challenges,” Mr. Obama said. “Russia is a regional power … More

    Anything But Reality TV: Obama CBS Interview on Ukraine

    President Obama ended a quick trip through Europe with a “CBS Evening News” interview in Rome, where he shared his latest thinking on the ongoing crisis in Crimea. It was one of the poorest performances by a world statesman since Neville Chamberlain’s press comments after returning from Munich in 1938. … More

    Why Ukraine May Make Iran Even More Determined to Go Nuclear

    They called it the Lisbon Protocol. In 1991, the U.S. and Russia agreed to historic reductions in nuclear weapons. But there was a hitch: Russia didn’t exactly own all of its nukes. When the Soviet Union collapsed, lots of them were left in the former vassal states of Belarus, Ukraine … More

    Russia Silences Political Opponents Through Judicial Abuse

    Outspoken anti-corruption crusader and whistleblower Alexei Navalny may face up to 10 years in prison in Russia for money laundering. Just weeks ago, a Russian court suspended a sentence he was serving for charges on embezzlement. This suggests that the siloviki (men of force) faction in the Kremlin is trying … More

    Russia Should Drop “You Are with Us or Against Us” Mantra

    Recently, several of Russia’s “younger siblings,” such as Ukraine and Moldova, finally got a chance to partially break from the Russian bear hug and opt for a closer integration with the West. They are members of the Eastern Partnership with the European Union, a close cooperation program with the EU, … More

    Syrian Geopolitical Chess: Putin’s One-Two Punch

    Vladimir Putin’s op-ed in The New York Times is an attempt to talk to the American people over the heads of its elected representatives. For a Russian foreign policy practitioner, it is also an act of information warfare. After all, Russia views the United States as a strategic competitor, if … More

    Snowden Asylum Is Burying Obama’s Russian "Reset"

    The Kremlin delivered a diplomatic blow to U.S.–Russian relations when Moscow granted former NSA analyst Edward Snowden a temporary political asylum. Now, the White House may cancel a U.S.–Russia summit that was scheduled for early September, and Obama’s Russian reset policy will require significant re-examination. This will be the first … More