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  • Missile Defense

    Morning Bell: Growing Risk of Another North Korean Attack

    North Korea never stops threatening its enemies. The belligerent dictatorship routinely threatens to turn Seoul, the capital of South Korea, into a “sea of fire.” Recent videos have threatened America with nuclear annihilation. Of course, after countless threats aren’t followed with action, the world wonders when to believe it. The … More

    The 30th Anniversary of SDI, President Reagan’s Visionary Idea

    Ronald Reagan’s Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) speech in 1983 launched a program to eliminate the threat posed by a nuclear attack and set the groundwork for today’s missile defense system. On March 19, The Heritage Foundation and the George C. Marshall Institute co-hosted an event commemorating the 30th anniversary of … More

    Obama’s Missile Defense Policy Reversal: Better Late Than Never

    The Obama Administration’s decision to reinstate 14 ground-based interceptors (GBIs)—which it reduced in its first term—is a necessary but not sufficient response to the North Korean ballistic missile threat. North Korea’s ballistic missile testing and bellicose rhetoric prompted the Administration to augment the Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) program. This decision … More

    The EMP Threat: Just a Scare?

    A recent National Journal article discussed the likelihood of an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) over the United States with skepticism, asking whether such activists and politicians are “[d]oomsday preppers or congressional visionaries” and claiming that the “the debate over the urgency remains stuck in a theoretical realm.” But the EMP threat … More

    Heritage Honors Dr. William Van Cleave

    Today, The Heritage Foundation commemorates and honors Dr. William Van Cleave, who passed away on Friday. Dr. Van Cleave, former Marine, was an astute champion of U.S. national interests and an experienced negotiator on strategic issues. As a participant in the U.S.–Russia Strategic Arms Limitation Talks negotiations in the 1970s, … More

    How Not to Negotiate with Russia: The Missile Defense Fiasco

    Russia’s objections to U.S. missile defense development and deployment have been on the agenda of consecutive American Administrations starting with Ronald Reagan in the 1980s. For President Obama, it became a high priority as Moscow turned missile defense disagreement into a principal bone of contention. But he threw it under … More

    Morning Bell: What Reagan Knew About Missile Defense

    It would take only 33 minutes for a missile to reach the U.S. from anywhere in the world. That’s a sobering thought when North Korea is taunting America with threatening video propaganda about its nuclear capabilities and Iran is advancing its nuclear program. In response to these threats, the Obama … More

    North Korea Threat: There Is No Substitute for a Strong U.S. Missile Defense

    Today, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel announced that the United States will shore up its missile defense system. Yet again, the Obama Administration is proving critics of its missile defense program correct. The U.S. will deploy additional 14 Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) interceptors in Alaska, deploy additional radar in Japan, … More

    Chaos from the Sky: Why the EMP Threat Is Real

    Two scholars from the congressionally mandated 2010 Commission to Assess the Threat to the United States from Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Attack make the case to protect the U.S. from a potentially catastrophic nuclear EMP attack on the U.S. by terrorists or rogue states. William Radasky and Peter Vincent Pry rebut … More

    North Korean Threat: Obama Administration Undermines Missile Defense

    Yesterday, White House spokesman Jay Carney asserted that the U.S. is “fully capable of defending itself” against a North Korean ballistic missile attack. Carney didn’t mention that the Obama Administration has tried to undermine the long-range missile defense program since it came into office. First, it decided to decrease the … More