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    Egypt: Who’s Who in the Transitional Government

    Egypt’s former President Mohamed Morsi no longer controls the purse strings or answers the direct line in the presidential palace. So who exactly is running Egypt’s political and economic affairs? The interim cabinet, comprised largely of anti-Morsi supporters and technocrats, now governs the country. Prime Minister Hazem El Beblawi has … More

    Iraq Unravels in the Shadow of Syria’s Bloodbath

    Iraq, which has fallen out of the spotlight since the December 2011 U.S. troop withdrawal, has been plagued by rising internal conflict and instability. On Monday, al-Qaeda terrorists launched a brazen attack on two prisons near Baghdad and freed more than 500 prisoners. While the world’s attention has been focused … More

    Q&A: U.S. Foreign Aid to Egypt

    James Phillips, Heritage’s senior research fellow for Middle Eastern affairs, answers key questions about U.S. foreign aid to Egypt. What is U.S. foreign aid to Egypt? The Obama Administration has requested $1.55 billion in total bilateral aid to Egypt for fiscal year 2014. This includes $1.3 billion in military aid … More

    Egypt: Egyptians Want Greater Economic Freedom Before Democracy

    For many ordinary Egyptians, fixing the economy is key. They are demanding a functioning economy that works under the rule of law. In fact, protesters have been demanding greater economic freedom, not necessarily greater democracy. Recognizing the critical distinction between these two cannot be overemphasized. In his thought-provoking chapter featured … More

    Q&A on Egypt

    Heritage expert James Jay Carafano, vice president of Foreign and Defense Policy Studies and the E. W. Richardson Fellow, gives his answers to questions about the turmoil in Egypt. Q. Is President Mohamed Morsi’s downfall a blow to democracy in the Middle East? A. No, far from it. Morsi was … More

    Egypt: Marines on Standby

    U.S. Marines from Morón, Spain, have been moved to the U.S. base in Sigonella, Italy, to station more forces closer to Egypt as a response to the events happening there. There is a sentiment among many in politics that America can pull back its global presence, cut the military, and … More

    Egypt: Morsi Regime Shaken by Massive Protests and Army Ultimatum

    Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, whose authoritarian misrule has provoked massive protests, is desperately clinging to power. Egypt has been roiled by nationwide demonstrations since Sunday, the first anniversary of Morsi’s inauguration. Protesters demanded that Morsi step down by today and called for early elections. Middle East expert Daniel Pipes has … More

    Turkish Protests Undermine Erdogan and His Foreign Policy

    Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has badly mishandled mushrooming protests, which could obstruct his political ambitions and constrain his latitude on foreign policy issues. The protests, which were initially triggered on May 28 by Erdogan’s plans to uproot trees in Gezi Park in Istanbul, quickly snowballed into nationwide anti-government … More

    Obama Administration Backs into Policy of Arming Syrian Rebels

    The White House announced yesterday that President Obama has authorized the transfer of arms to Syria’s rebels after concluding that Bashar al-Assad’s regime had violated the president’s red line against the use of chemical weapons. The Obama Administration needed to reverse course and take stronger action in Syria to enforce … More

    U.S. Presence in Europe Critical in the Years Ahead

    Last year, the House of Representatives passed an amendment that called for the removal of all four U.S. Army Brigade Combat Teams (BCTs) currently based in Europe. This year, four Congressmen want to take it a step further, seriously undermining U.S. national security interests. Representatives Mike Coffman (R–CO), Morgan Griffith … More