• The Heritage Network
    • Resize:
    • A
    • A
    • A
  • Donate
  • Keynesian

    Paul Krugman: Selective Data Usage

    Paul Krugman, in the words of a former New York Times public editor, “has the disturbing habit of shaping, slicing and selectively citing numbers.” Most recently, he selectively cited numbers about austerity in Europe, hoping to redefine the policies that made the German economy so buoyant. Germany is worth paying … More

    Sorry, Janet Yellen, We Can’t Spend Our Way to Prosperity

    In spite of aggressive expansionary Federal Reserve policies and several rounds of fiscal stimulus since 2007, the U.S. economy has yet to take off. Nonetheless, some officials are refusing to give up and even explaining to the public exactly how these Keynesian stimulus policies will (eventually) work. In a Time … More

    Larry Summers, Satirist

    One must applaud Larry Summers for his cagey satire in a Washington Post op-ed today. He lets on—subtly—that the recent resurrection of “secular stagnation” is all an elaborate spoof. Secular stagnation is an odd theory that predicts a perpetually weak economy due to low desire to invest. It contradicts both … More

    The Fed Inflation-Unemployment Trade-Off: Outlasting the Energizer Bunny

    George Selgin has a new post on the Free Banking Blog that highlights the economic quandary the Fed now has the U.S. in. The post uses subtle sarcasm to make an excellent point, but many readers may miss Selgin’s main idea. Selgin starts by discussing the current policy debate surrounding … More

    European Central Bank Lowers Interest Rates, Trumping "Zero Lower Bound" Theory

    The European Central Bank (ECB) lowered a key interest rate to 0.25 percent on Thursday. This is a big deal, since it demonstrates that the ECB has the ability and the will to stabilize euro inflation, which has fallen below the ECB’s target and become a drag on real growth. … More

    Japan’s Revolving Door Tax

    Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is likely to increase Japan’s sales tax from 5 percent to 8 percent next year. Abe and his close ally Haruhiko Kuroda, head of the Bank of Japan, have long advocated for increasing Japan’s money supply by targeting a higher inflation rate in an attempt to … More

    Obama on Infrastructure: Wrong Again on Government “Investments”

    In yet another summer speech on the economy yesterday, President Obama trotted out familiar tax-and-spend ideas, this time pairing his latest call for a tax increase with his familiar call for increased government “investment” on infrastructure. He touched upon a host of wish-list projects: widening roads, dredging ports, repairing older … More

    Cut Government Spending to Help the Economy? Majority Say Yes

    A recent Rasmussen poll (subscription required) found that 65 percent of likely voters want the government to cut spending to help alleviate the country’s economic woes. Four years after the official end of the recession in June 2009, the economy is growing sluggishly. As The Wall Street Journal reports today, … More

    Austerity and Stimulus: A Response to The Washington Post

    Journalists should check with both sides before committing pen to paper, especially those at respectable outlets like The Washington Post. It would have served Post reporter Dylan Matthews well if he had followed this dictum. In a blog post, Matthews attempted to refute testimony I gave before the Senate Budget … More

    Meretricious? Senator Whitehouse Is Projecting

    Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) spent eight minutes berating me at a Senate Budget Committee hearing yesterday. He disliked the facts I presented on austerity, so he called into question my professional honor and integrity. My testimony pointed out that structural reform and well-designed spending cuts are the best policy for stabilizing … More