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    9 Things Janet Yellen Tried to Say Carefully as the Dow Plunged

    Janet Yellen appeared to emerge with her confidence intact this afternoon after her first press conference as chairman of the Federal Reserve. However, stock markets dropped sharply when, as head of the nation’s central bank, she said the Fed may begin to raise interest rates “six months” after the final … More

    Sorry, Janet Yellen, We Can’t Spend Our Way to Prosperity

    In spite of aggressive expansionary Federal Reserve policies and several rounds of fiscal stimulus since 2007, the U.S. economy has yet to take off. Nonetheless, some officials are refusing to give up and even explaining to the public exactly how these Keynesian stimulus policies will (eventually) work. In a Time … More

    The Fed Inflation-Unemployment Trade-Off: Outlasting the Energizer Bunny

    George Selgin has a new post on the Free Banking Blog that highlights the economic quandary the Fed now has the U.S. in. The post uses subtle sarcasm to make an excellent point, but many readers may miss Selgin’s main idea. Selgin starts by discussing the current policy debate surrounding … More

    European Central Bank Lowers Interest Rates, Trumping "Zero Lower Bound" Theory

    The European Central Bank (ECB) lowered a key interest rate to 0.25 percent on Thursday. This is a big deal, since it demonstrates that the ECB has the ability and the will to stabilize euro inflation, which has fallen below the ECB’s target and become a drag on real growth. … More

    Lowering Loan Limits: An Overdue Step to Bringing Private Capital Back to Housing

    As legislation moves through Congress to address the fate of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) has indicated it will decrease the limit on the size of the loans these institutions can purchase starting in 2014. The FHFA should decrease the loan limit independent of … More

    Federal Student Loans Cost Taxpayers Money

    This piece originally appeared on See Thru Edu, a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation. The Congressional Budget Office has just released an assessment of what the Federal Direct Student Loan program will cost taxpayers using various accounting measures. As has been noted before, any student loan proposal should … More

    Morning Bell: 17 Reasons the $17 Trillion Debt Is Still a Big Deal

    Remember the debt? That $17 trillion problem? Some in Washington seem to think it’s gone away. The Washington Post reported that “the national debt is no longer growing out of control.” Lawmakers and liberal inside-the-Beltway organizations are floating the notion that it’s not a high priority any more. We beg … More

    Morning Bell: Time to Shrink the Monster

    Does the debt ceiling affect YOU? It does—in many ways. A new video by Bankrupting America uses humor to call attention to an issue that is anything but funny, and why it matters for every American household. Recent Heritage research reveals how the rising national debt hurts American families, including: … More

    The Unknown Cost of Federal Student Loans

    Starting July 1, interest rates on federal student loans are set to rise from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent. As Congress again considers preventing the interest rate on federal student loans from doubling, the cost to taxpayers should be a central issue. However, in a recent Issue Brief, Heritage analyst … More

    National Financial Capability Month: Is President Obama Setting a Good Example?

    Last week, the President declared April 2013 National Financial Capability Month in an effort to encourage Americans to budget responsibly. This is a commendable goal. However, with the President’s budget more than two months late, it’s worth considering how the President is managing the nation’s finances: He grew the national … More