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  • Index of Economic Freedom

    Promoting Economic Freedom in Asia: Time for Secretary Lew to Step Up

    U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew is touring Asia this week. He will visit Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, and Vietnam and end with a much-anticipated visit to China. What should he be promoting while meeting with high-level officials in the region? Well, economic freedom, of course. Asia is home to some of … More

    Wal-Mart and Economic Freedom in India

    Wal-Mart recently decided to part ways with the Indian firm Bharti, thus ending its efforts to penetrate India. The breakdown in cooperation between the Indian and American firms highlights some of the hardships that businesses face when considering operating in India. Due to strict foreign direct investment (FDI) regulations, undeveloped … More

    Brazil’s Internet: A Showdown of Ends and Means

    Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff wants to free Brazil’s Internet access from U.S. domination. Rousseff and the Brazilian government seek to accomplish this “cyber sovereignty” by strong-arming U.S. companies into establishing local data centers, laying a new fiber-optic link from Brazil through South Africa to Asia, and partnering with Russia on … More

    Still No African Leader Worthy of the Ibrahim Award

    For the fourth time in five years the Mo Ibrahim Foundation has failed to find a suitable candidate for the world’s most valuable individual award ($5 million over 10 years, then $200,000 per year for life): the Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership. Africa is home to some of the world’s … More

    Why Japan Should Reengineer Innovation

    The Japanese are good at innovation. It was their reengineering techniques that propelled them to a top world competitor in the 1980s. But since stagnation began 20 years ago, Japan’s skill of innovating is still only good. It needs to be great. Most economies can be categorized by four characteristics: … More

    U.S.-Brazil Relations: Where Do We Go from Here?

    In an unusual move, Dilma Rousseff, president of Brazil, canceled a state visit to the U.S., citing her discontent with the Obama Administration’s response in the wake of National Security Agency (NSA) spying allegations. This embarrassing snub should force the White House to redress its foreign policy toward the region. … More

    An Opportunity for Greater U.S.-Nigeria Ties

    President Obama will meet with the Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan tonight on the margins of the U.N General Assembly in New York. Counterterrorism and energy security should be at the top of the meeting’s discussion agenda, along with Nigeria’s greater economic integration within West Africa and the continent. The recent … More

    Obama’s MCC Rewards Bad Behavior in El Salvador

    Last week, the U.S. government’s Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) approved a five-year, $277 million foreign aid compact with El Salvador. But, as Mary O’Grady reports in The Wall Street Journal, since the ruling FMLN party came to power in 2009, El Salvador has become poorer, less democratic, and less free. … More

    A Swedish (Economic) Lesson for President Obama in One Chart

    President Obama is making the first ever bilateral visit to Sweden by a sitting U.S. President. As The Heritage Foundation and Swedish think tank Timbro discussed in a recent Google Hangout, the President should learn from Sweden that advancing economic freedom, not big-government policies, is the driver of economic dynamism. … More

    Energy: As Mexico Finally Enters the 21st Century, Obama Parties Like It’s 1938

    Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto recently announced the first, very timid steps to take Mexico’s energy sector—famously nationalized in 1938 by then-President Lázaro Cárdenas—forward into the 21st century. Meanwhile, President Obama seems intent on taking U.S. energy back to 1938—the original heyday for New Deal big-government types. Peña Nieto’s proposal … More