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  • human rights

    Russian “Grandma of Human Rights” Nominated for Nobel Prize

    This week, Senator Benjamin Cardin (D–MD) nominated the “grandma” of the Russian human rights movement, Lyudmila Alekseeva, for the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. Cardin’s nomination of the veteran of the dissident movement affirms the United States’ support for human rights activists in Russia and gives this “peacemaker” the recognition she … More

    Dead Man on Trial: Russian Whistleblower Tried After Death

    The Russian government is set to posthumously try the brutally murdered whistleblower Sergei Magnitsky for tax fraud. While working for Hermitage Capital, formerly one of Russia’s largest foreign investment firms, Magnitsky uncovered a massive fraud and accused Russian police and tax officials of embezzling $230 million from the Russian treasury. … More

    March for Life: I Am the Pro-Life Generation (VIDEO)

    For the past 40 years, pro-life advocates from all over the country annually march in solidarity to raise awareness for the most vulnerable in society—the unborn. Without fail, the 40th anniversary March for Life brought large crowds to the National Mall today in the hope of securing the right to … More

    Atrocities in Burma a Reminder of Human Rights Concerns

    Over the past month, violence between the Burmese government and the Kachin, a small Christian minority group, has escalated. Just this week, three people were killed and at least four were wounded amid destruction that has displaced nearly 100,000. The violence is the latest episode in the ongoing conflict since … More

    Kerry in Spotlight; Hot Issues Remain for Next Secretary of State

    Last week, embattled U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice took herself out of the running for Secretary of State as Hillary Clinton’s successor. It did not take long for the rumor mill to pick up that President Obama is leaning toward Senator John Kerry (D-MA) for the post. Though Rice did not … More

    A Rare Showing of Bipartisanship

    Yesterday, in a rare showing of bipartisanship, the lame-duck Senate passed the Russia and Moldova Jackson–Vanik Repeal Act of 2012 by a vote of 92–4. The Senate took up the version of the bill that passed by an overwhelming majority in the U.S. House of Representatives last month, which grants … More

    Three Years as Cuba's Hostage: Freedom for Alan Gross Still Far Away

    Alan Gross could’ve been your neighbor. An American baby boomer who loved to play the mandolin and snack on sunflower seeds, Gross had a big heart. He chose a job that took him all over the world to help equip those struggling under political and economic oppression. Sadly, Alan Gross … More

    Normal Trade Relations with Russia: We're Almost There

    On August 22, after almost 20 years of negotiations, Russia became the 156th member of World Trade Organization (WTO). Regrettably for the U.S., Russia has still not been granted permanent normal trade relations (PNTR) status, meaning that the U.S. cannot fully benefit from Russia’s new status in the WTO. As … More

    Senator Kerry's Fallacious Emotional Appeal for a U.N. Treaty

    When the facts and law are not in one’s favor, there is a natural temptation to appeal to the emotions of your target audience in order to win an argument. This is referred to as argumentum ad passiones—an attempt to manipulate an audience’s emotions by pulling on their heartstrings in … More

    United Nations Declares Contraception Access a "Human Right"

    In the United Nations Population Fund’s (UNFPA) recent State of World Population report, access to contraception is described as a “universal human right.” While the report has no legal force, it declares that cultural and financial barriers to accessing contraception are an infringement on women’s rights. While access to contraceptives … More