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    Snowden “on a Leash”: The High-Stakes Game in Russia

    President Obama is considering cancellation of his summit with Russian president Vladimir Putin at the September G-20 confab over Russia’s harboring of the American fugitive Edward Snowden. This would be the first time since the end of the Cold War that the U.S. cancels a previously scheduled summit. Snowden gave … More

    Hatch: U.S. Should Protect Sovereignty, Not Promote a U.N. Treaty

    Senator Orrin Hatch (R–UT) delivered a broadside on the Senate floor last week to proponents of U.S. ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), a United Nations human rights treaty signed by the Obama Administration in July 2009. Senator Hatch analyzed the treaty in the … More

    Egypt: U.S. Should Take a Stand for Democracy

    The Obama Administration’s indecision in the face of current events in Egypt is backfiring. Freedom-aspiring Egyptians are angry with the U.S. for supporting now-deposed President Mohamed Morsi as he became more and more authoritarian, while Morsi’s backers are angry with the U.S. for supporting a military coup of a democratically … More

    Q&A: U.S. Foreign Aid to Egypt

    James Phillips, Heritage’s senior research fellow for Middle Eastern affairs, answers key questions about U.S. foreign aid to Egypt. What is U.S. foreign aid to Egypt? The Obama Administration has requested $1.55 billion in total bilateral aid to Egypt for fiscal year 2014. This includes $1.3 billion in military aid … More

    American Pastor Languishing in North Korea Labor Camp

    In a newly released video interview, Kenneth Bae, a Christian pastor and Korean-American imprisoned in a North Korean labor camp, pleads for the U.S. government to take up his case and advocate for his freedom. Bae has been sentenced to 15 years in a North Korean prison camp, where he … More

    Q&A on Egypt

    Heritage expert James Jay Carafano, vice president of Foreign and Defense Policy Studies and the E. W. Richardson Fellow, gives his answers to questions about the turmoil in Egypt. Q. Is President Mohamed Morsi’s downfall a blow to democracy in the Middle East? A. No, far from it. Morsi was … More

    “Women Deliver” Fails to Deliver for Women’s Basic Needs

      Women Deliver hosted its third annual conference last month as part of its effort to achieve the targets set forth in the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 5, and as in previous years, the speakers and events focused primarily on contraception and abortion. Among the “development” community, any … More

    Hill Concern over U.S.–Burma Military Engagement Grows

    First, the House of Representatives moved to draw a line on American engagement with the Burmese military. Now, the Senate is beginning to stir. The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that passed the House a couple of weeks ago contains language expressing the sense of Congress that “the Department of … More

    “Russian Reset”: Time to Listen to the Critics

    In a well-reasoned broadside, The Washington Post’s editorial board blasted President Obama’s Russian policy and his Berlin speech this past Thursday. The editorial justly criticized the naiveté with which Obama reached out to Russian president Vladimir Putin with a badly thought out proposal to cut a third of the U.S. … More

    Burma: Drawing the Line on Military Relations

    Late last night, the House Armed Services Committee drew a line on American military relations with Burma. The committee passed an amendment to the annual National Defense Authorization Act offered by Representative Trent Franks (R–AZ) expressing the sense of Congress that “the Department of Defense should fully consider and assess … More