• The Heritage Network
    • Resize:
    • A
    • A
    • A
  • Donate
  • human rights

    Iran: Human Rights Record Belies New Era

    One look at the human rights record of Iran should serve as a warning against President Hassan Rouhani’s charm offensive launched at the United Nations on Tuesday. “My hope, aside from personal and national experience, emanates from the belief shared by all divine religions that a good and bright future … More

    The Tragedy of Forced Abortion Abroad

    On January 11, 2011, Lili Zeng was nine months pregnant. Her pregnancy violated Chinese law. With a signature from her ex-husband, seven family planning officials forcibly restrained her and injected a needle into her abdomen. Within hours she delivered her baby, and the next day her newborn baby died. Zeng’s … More

    DeMint Writes Letter to Vladimir Putin on American Exceptionalism

    This week in The New York Times—on September 11, no less—Russian President Vladimir Putin took issue with the idea of American exceptionalism. He wrote: It is extremely dangerous to encourage people to see themselves as exceptional, whatever the motivation. There are big countries and small countries, rich and poor, those with … More

    North Korea’s Crimes Against Humanity

    The United Nations commission of inquiry on human rights abuses in North Korea began taking testimony from defectors in South Korea yesterday. It is the first U.N. commission to investigate whether North Korea’s human rights abuses could be classified as crimes against humanity. “Crimes against humanity” are legally defined as … More

    4 Things John Kerry Got Wrong in a 4½-Minute Video

    Secretary of State John Kerry has a new, impassioned video appeal for the U.S. Senate to consent to ratification of the U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Kerry’s speechwriters should have checked their facts, though. Among Kerry’s mistakes and mischaracterizations are the following: “[The CRPD] will … More

    Burma’s Release of Child Soldiers: Promising, but Not Enough

    This past week, Burma announced the release of 68 child soldiers from its ranks. This latest action is promising, but progress toward ridding the army of its estimated 5,000 child soldiers is likely to be a long and arduous process. The U.S. should maintain pressure on Burma to ensure that … More

    Accounting for Facts While Courting Vietnam

    Fact: When the United States negotiates trade agreements with countries that oppress their people, the opportunity exists to liberalize institutions and ultimately create political reform—provided we have leadership with the vision to do so. Seeking economic growth, the government of Vietnam is slowly liberalizing key economic sectors. Vietnam’s inclusion in … More

    Paying Homage to the Brave Men and Women of Korean War

    Sixty years ago today, the armistice was signed to end the brutal three-year war that had devastated the Korean Peninsula. North Korea’s invasion in June 1950 made all too clear the true nature of the regime — its willingness to blatantly violate international agreements, its eagerness to use military attacks … More

    Snowden “on a Leash”: The High-Stakes Game in Russia

    President Obama is considering cancellation of his summit with Russian president Vladimir Putin at the September G-20 confab over Russia’s harboring of the American fugitive Edward Snowden. This would be the first time since the end of the Cold War that the U.S. cancels a previously scheduled summit. Snowden gave … More

    Hatch: U.S. Should Protect Sovereignty, Not Promote a U.N. Treaty

    Senator Orrin Hatch (R–UT) delivered a broadside on the Senate floor last week to proponents of U.S. ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), a United Nations human rights treaty signed by the Obama Administration in July 2009. Senator Hatch analyzed the treaty in the … More