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    Burma Is Not Ready for Mil-to-Mil Cooperation with the U.S.

    Has Burma made enough reforms to have military-to-military cooperation with the U.S.? Congressman Steve Chabot (R–OH) says no. In a recent speech at The Heritage Foundation, Chabot noted that the Obama Administration has been too hasty to reward Burma for its reforms and is unclear on what its policies in … More

    Human Rights: A Quiet Victory in the Americas

    In early June, the Organization of American States (OAS) elected three new members to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), an OAS body, whose sole purpose is to promote and protect human rights in the region. The candidate from Ecuador, Erick Roberts Garcés, was not elected, and for that, … More

    Opposition to Burma’s “Two-Child Policy” Mounting

    Burma’s political icon, Aung san Suu Kyi, is finally speaking out about the plight of ethnic populations in Burma, and the U.S. State Department seems to be listening. Burma is facing opposition from the U.S. for its “two-child policy” targeting the Muslim minority Rohingya. Recent enforcement of the 1994 two-child … More

    Administration Burma Policy: Lift Sanctions, Ask Questions Later

    President Obama’s meeting with Burma’s President Thein Sein at the White House today is a stark reminder of how far the Administration has come on Burma policy. In initiating the annual process for renewal of the ban on Burmese imports last week, Representative Joseph Crowley (D–NY) reiterated his desire that … More

    Human Rights Watch Decries Russia Opposition Crackdown

    Human Rights Watch (HRW) recently released a scathing new report focused on the crackdown on Russia’s civil society. Since December 2011, the Kremlin has committed to squashing nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) that promote democracy and are alleged conduits of Western influence, HRW says. The report, titled “Laws of Attrition,” focuses on … More

    U.S. Calls for Investigation of Cuban Opposition Leader’s Death

    Recent remarks by Spanish official Ángel Carromero in The Washington Post are shedding new light on the events that resulted in the death of Cuban dissident and human rights activist Oswaldo Payá. Carromero was driving the vehicle in which Payá was traveling along with two other passengers in July 2012 … More

    Venezuela Tries to Weaken Human Rights Watchdog

    A group of populist Latin American states—led by Bolivia, Ecuador, and Venezuela—hopes to reduce the role of an international human rights commission and watchdog. These radical states aim to weaken the commission because it goes against their political ambitions, as it entails scrutiny and judgments of human rights violations by … More

    Russia Conducts Unannounced Searches of Human Rights Groups

    Russian law enforcement agents have conducted hundreds of unannounced searches of Russian non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Authorities have searched 600 organizations across the country since last week, according to media reports. An interagency law enforcement task force raided Amnesty International’s Moscow office in an unannounced inspection on Monday. Sergei Nikitin, the … More

    Dictator Castro Now In Charge of Latin American Pro-Democracy Group

    In Santiago, Chile, on January 28, the new regional body, the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC), passed its rotating presidency to Cuba’s dictator General Raul Castro. CELAC, according to prime backer Hugo Chavez of Venezuela, is part of a historic project to build a Latin American/Caribbean union … More

    With Burma, the Devil is in the Details

    Tomorrow, The Heritage Foundation will host a panel of experts for a very timely discussion on recent events in Burma and the proper responses to them. The distinguished panel will include Tom Malinowski, Washington director for Human Rights Watch; Aung Din, executive director of the U.S. Campaign for Burma; Jared … More