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    Ryan Budget: Some Smart Reforms, but Education Spending Continues Apace

    The budget presented by House Budget Committee chairman Paul Ryan (R–Wis.) provides a topline function 500 (spending on education, training, employment, and social services) budget of nearly $74 billion. The $73.9 billion budget ($864 billion over 10 years) makes some important reforms to the federal Pell Grant program. It would … More

    Lady Gaga and “The Walking Dead”? What Are College Students Learning These Days?

    “The Fame Monster: The Cultural Politics of Lady Gaga”; “Blame It on the Bossa Nova: The Historical Transnational Phenomenon”; “The Sociology of the Living Dead: Zombie Films”; “Fairytales: Russia and the World.” No, these aren’t the names of the newest hit cable show—these are courses offered at accredited U.S. colleges … More

    GUEST POST: Common Core Math Standards Do Not Prepare U.S. Students for STEM Careers. How Come?

    Most states adopted Common Core’s mathematics standards because they were told that these standards would make all high school students “college- and career-ready” and strengthen the critical pipeline for science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Not so. With the exception of a few standards in trigonometry, the math standards end … More

    Banned from Handing Out Constitutions on Constitution Day

    On Constitution Day this year, Robert Van Tuinen, an Army veteran and a student at Modesto Junior College (MJC) in California, was trying to pass out copies of the United States Constitution and drum up support for his proposed Young Americans for Liberty chapter on campus. School administrators at MJC … More

    Restoring Dialogue About Marriage on College Campuses

    When the Thomas More Society of Boston College invited Ryan T. Anderson, the William E. Simon Fellow at The Heritage Foundation, to make the case for marriage as the union of a man and a woman at a campus forum last week, some students questioned whether the talk should even … More

    Morning Bell: 4 Problems with Federal College Scorecards

    Yesterday, President Obama announced his plan to make “college more affordable, tackle rising costs, and improve value for students and their families.” But a big part of the President’s plan includes creating a college rating system—a federal scorecard—to evaluate colleges on measures such as graduation rates, the number of low-income … More

    Common Core: Homeschoolers Face New Questions on College Admissions

    New information on Common Core “alignment” by the ACT, SAT, and even GED exams raises questions about the impact Common Core will have on private and homeschooled students and their ability to “opt out” of the federally incentivized standards if they want to apply for college. David Coleman, new head … More

    Another Supreme Chance to Ban Discrimination

    On Monday, the Supreme Court agreed to review an important case on race and sex discrimination (also known as affirmative action) that will give it another chance to overturn a court of appeals ruling and confirm that discrimination is always wrong. Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action is an … More

    Minnesota Bans Free Online Courses

    Almost as heartbreaking as burning books, a move by the Minnesota Office of Higher Education will rank among those incomprehensible moments in human history when we seem to be handicapping ourselves for no reason. Lifelong learners, students wanting supplemental courses, professionals, and Americans across the country interested in enrolling in … More

    WORD CLOUD: Obama and Romney at the Second Presidential Debate

    Long Island’s Hofstra University was the scene of the second presidential debate this election cycle. This time the questions didn’t come from a moderator but from undecided voters of Nassau County, N.Y., whose questions were screened by CNN’s Candy Crowley. These uncommitted voters, selected by Gallup, did in fact, “drive … More