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    NDAA Detainee Provisions Road Map to Closing Gitmo?

    The combined House/Senate agreement on the 2014 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) has two key terrorist-detainee-related provisions worth highlighting. Section 1039 requires the Attorney General, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense, to prepare a report on the “legal rights, if any” for any Gitmo detainee transferred to the United … More

    Obama at United Nations: The World Is Safer—or It Isn’t

      President Obama this morning laid out a foreign policy roadmap for the remainder of his presidency. However, his audience at the United Nations General Assembly might be excused for finding it confusing. In Obama’s speech, assertions were followed by contradictions, and top priorities were undermined by caveats. Under leadership … More

    Morning Bell: Top Six Reasons We Got Osama bin Laden

    Taking down Osama bin Laden was an achievement resulting from a culmination of a decade of national security policy. Soft power and diplomacy helped along the way, but it was hard power and military might that made it possible. President George W. Bush put the correct policies in place, including … More

    WikiLeaking on GITMO

    WikiLeaks, which has been sitting on an enormous cache of classified U.S. government documents, released another batch of materials to U.S. and European news “partners” including The New York Times. According to press reports, the documents include “intelligence assessments of nearly every one of the 779 individuals who have been … More

    Congress and White House Must Stand By Decision On 9/11 Trials

    Following Attorney General Eric Holder’s announcement Monday that the United States would try  Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and his four co-conspirators in military commissions at Guantanamo Bay, The Heritage Foundation’s Senior Legal Fellow, Cully Stimson, testified at a House Judiciary Committee hearing Tuesday on the 9/11 trials. Stimson’s message? The right … More

    Holder "Reluctantly" Sends KSM to Military Commissions

    Bowing to political realities, the Obama administration reversed itself and announced that Khalid Sheikh Mohammad (KSM), the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks, would be tried at Guantanamo in a military commission, instead of in a federal court in the United States.  The decision comes as the 10-year anniversary of the … More

    When Will Congress Wake Up on Homeland Security?

    It’s been 9 years since the 9/11 attacks. America is still being attacked—the Times Square and Christmas Day plots are the most recent examples.  Congress, however, continues to act like it is still September 10, 2001.  For instance: It continues to ignore key 9/11 Commission recommendations—the Commission emphasized that Congress … More

    Guest Blogger: Congressman Jeff Miller (R-FL) On Investigating the John Adams Project

    During this past Wednesday’s mark-up of the Fiscal Year 2011 National Defense Authorization Act my fellow conservatives on the House Armed Services Committee stood strongly on the side of the American people, vociferously fighting for security, liberty, and freedom through our Defend America First platform.  One of the issues debated … More

    Why Military Tribunals Are Consistent with the Geneva Conventions

    At last week’s Senate Judiciary Committee hearing, after Attorney General Eric Holder again refused to rule out a civilian trial for Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) shot back: “We know the administration is not going to hold the trial in New York. They should just say it already.” … More

    Founding Fathers Never Intended Courts to Make National Security Decisions

    Yesterday  Attorney General Eric Holder announced that the Obama Justice Department would appeal a U.S. District Court Judge James Robertson’s order to release 9/11 terrorist operative Mohamedou Ould Slahi. This is a good decision by Holder. Our nation would be less safe if Slahi was released from U.S. custody. But … More