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    Ukrainian Journalist: If Russians ‘Want to Start War, They Usually Do’

    Ukrainian journalist Mykola Vorobiov, warning of the consequences of Russian expansionism, said he is “not optimistic” about the potential for negotiations over Russia’s seizing of the Crimea region from Ukraine.  “If [the Russians] want to start the war, they usually do,” Vorobiov, chief editor of the Euro-Patrol outlet, said yesterday at The Heritage Foundation. … More

    Vlad's Excellent Autocratic Adventure

    A great deal of ink has been spilt over the evolving situation in Ukraine, and Russian President Vladimir Putin’s de facto annexation of Crimea. At present, Crimea’s parliament has called for a public referendum to consider formal secession from Ukraine—the vote will be held on March 16. The Ukrainian government … More

    Georgia Fails to Pass Civil Forfeiture Reform

    Civil forfeiture has gained prominence as a tool to combat the drug trade; however, its targets can be as mundane as motorists or as industrious as independent grocers. Civil forfeiture abuse is a real problem, and many states are considering reforming these laws to protect innocent people who too often … More

    What Obama Wants for Your Children and Grandchildren

    Proud parents and grandparents are sharing photos of their kids’ first day of school. And as students head back, many states are pushing back—telling the Obama Administration that its federal education plan isn’t right for their students. Anyone who has taught in a classroom knows how different children are from … More

    Millennium Challenge Corporation Goes Off Course in Georgia

    The U.S. government’s Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) Board of Directors recently approved a five-year, $140 million compact with the nation of Georgia “to increase the quality of human capital by investing in science and technology education and workforce development” with an emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)” and … More

    Georgia Leader Beats Drum for Nuclear Energy

    Georgia is riding a wave of new nuclear energy that, five years ago, many thought would be more crowded by now. Georgia Public Services Commissioner Tim Echols, a champion of using market forces to help solve our nuclear waste problems, has seen firsthand how important getting nuclear energy policy right matters. … More

    Georgia Reclaims Control of Testing; Neighbor Florida to Consider the Same

    Georgia is withdrawing from the Common Core national assessments, and neighboring Florida could soon follow suit. Georgia Governor Nathan Deal (R), along with Superintendent John Barge, sent a letter to the district superintendents throughout the Peach State last week announcing the decision. Georgia’s move highlights both immediate, practical concerns and … More

    The U.S.–Russia Cybersecurity Pact: Just Paper

    The U.S. and Russia announced the completion of a joint cybersecurity agreement, two years in the making, intended to promote international peace and security and improve cyber relations between the two countries. The agreement, however, amounts to little more than a piece of paper, as such policies will scarcely improve … More

    Morning Bell: Obamacare's Medicaid Trap

    While Members of Congress are arguing about defunding parts of Obamacare, the rubber is meeting the road in the states. Governors and state legislatures are sweating decisions about setting up government health care exchanges and expanding the Medicaid program. While the offer of additional federal money for Medicaid is tempting … More

    Obamacare and the Medicaid Expansion: How Does Your State Fare?

    The Medicaid expansion is touted by proponents of Obamacare as a “no-brainer.” While it is true that some states may see projected savings, it is erroneous to claim that this experience applies to every state. Proponents predict that by expanding Medicaid states will be able to reduce payments to health … More