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  • G-8

    Western Leaders Suspend Russia from G8; Now They Should Downgrade the G20

    The leaders of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States (the G7), plus the president of the European Council and the president of the European Commission, met yesterday in The Hague to reaffirm their support for Ukraine’s sovereignty, territorial integrity, and independence. They also made … More

    Russia: Kerry’s Chilly Kremlin Reception

    This past Tuesday, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry met President Vladimir Putin of Russia in the Kremlin. Kerry was seeking to repair frayed ties with Russia and obtain Moscow’s assistance with a settlement in Syria. The U.S. and its allies hope to put an end to the civil war, … More

    G-8: Hiding in the Woods

    No one outside of the White House knows exactly why the President decided to move the G-8 meeting this Friday from Chicago to Camp David. Speculation that security concerns were driving the change in venue is probably off base given that the NATO summit scheduled two days later is continuing … More

    Time To End The Summit Tsunami

    Back in September, Heritage fellow James Roberts wrote of the G-20 Summit in Pittsburgh: In the past 10 months, the leaders of the G-8 and G-20 nations have met three times at elaborate and expensive summits to address the world’s financial woes. … Originally a Group of Six–France, Germany, Italy, … More

    Trade, Not Aid, Is Best Course for G-8 Ag Policy

    Tourists might buy souvenirs, but President Obama is seeking “deliverables” he can bring home to convince Americans that the millions of their tax dollars spent to send the huge U.S. delegation to the G-8 Meeting in Italy this week was money well spent. So, he has been leaning on other … More

    New Global Warming Targets That Miss the Mark

    At the G8 Summit in Japan, there was much talk about global warming, and considerable self-congratulation over the agreement among member nations to reduce greenhouse gas emission by 50% by 2050. There were also predictable cries from environmentalists that this target was not sufficiently stringent or legally binding. But negotiations … More