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  • Frederick Douglass

    Humility: An Unlikely Biography of America’s Greatest Virtue

    If you want to assess the state of humility among politicians today, just think about how often you hear leaders admit that they are wrong and then change course. This is how Dr. David J. Bobb of Hillsdale College, speaking at a Heritage event, framed the topic of his new … More

    Frederick Douglass: From Slavery to Freedom to Statuesque

    The only thing that’s really surprising is that it took so long. Lawmakers recently unveiled a statue of Frederick Douglass in the Emancipation Hall of the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center. Nothing could be more fitting because his life exemplifies the promise and opportunity available to all Americans. After being born … More

    Frederick Douglass: America’s Valentine

    Valentine’s Day is the perfect day to eat chocolate or dote on freshly delivered red roses. Oh, and to celebrate the 19th-century abolitionist Frederick Douglass. Born into slavery on Maryland’s Eastern Shore in February 1818, Douglass was given the improbably dignified name “Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey.” Like many people born … More

    Progressive Privilege: Divide and Conquer by Race

    The United States today may be the most color-blind society in history. We’re a country that is led by a black President and has legal guarantees of equal rights for all. Racist groups are almost non-existent and are more likely to invite ridicule than attract recruits. Yet many who ought … More

    Today in History: Frederick Douglass and Valentine's Day

    Born into slavery, Frederick Douglass made his mark in history as an abolitionist with a special place in his heart for America and its founding principles. Douglass, who knew only that he was born sometime in February 1818, chose the 14th as his birthday because his mother, who died when … More

    Frederick Douglass: America's Valentine

    Valentine’s Day is the perfect day to eat chocolate, dote on freshly delivered red roses, and to celebrate the 19th century abolitionist, Frederick Douglass. Born into slavery on Maryland’s Eastern Shore sometime in February 1818, Frederick Douglass was given the improbably dignified name “Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey.” Like many people … More

    Morning Bell: Frederick Douglass’s Irrepressible Faith in America

    As we celebrate Martin Luther King Day, it is fitting to reflect upon the tortured experience of blacks in this country. Looking back upon four centuries of African-American history two things are undeniably clear: for the greatest part of America’s history, blacks were grossly mistreated and the country has come … More

    The Colorblind Constitution: Frederick Douglass on Race and America’s Founding

    In a move one blogger called “Huck Finning the Constitution,” the 112th Congress left out the infamous “three-fifths compromise” in their much-publicized reading of the Constitution on the House floor. The “three-fifths compromise” is a clause in Article I, Section 2, which states the number of Congressional representatives from a … More