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    Meet the Humble Nuns Who Just Shook Up the Obama Administration

    Who takes care of poor people when they get old—when they are on their deathbeds? For thousands of people, the answer is Little Sisters of the Poor. “The elderly are at risk, with no one to speak up for them, no one to stand up and to express to the … More

    While Obama Remakes the Courts, Harry Reid Wants to Remake the Senate

    Every few months, it seems, Harry Reid (D-NV) threatens to upend the Senate so that he can push something through without following the rules. This time, it’s the President’s judicial nominees. President Obama is already well on his way to remaking federal courts in the liberal image, but Reid insists … More

    Harry Reid and the Nuclear Option: A Shortsighted Alternative to Senate Deliberation

    Earlier this week, Senate Republicans halted the confirmation of Robert Wilkins to the D.C. Circuit, making it the third nomination to that court as part of President Obama’s court-packing plan to fail in the last month. Now there are reports that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D–NV) may attempt to … More

    Public Opinion and the Supreme Court

    A recent Rasmussen poll shows that public approval of the Supreme Court of the United States is at an all-time low. Only 28 percent of those surveyed gave the Supreme Court a “good” or “excellent” rating, while the justices’ “poor” rating has risen to 30 percent. This negative rating is … More

    Is the Supreme Court the Final Word?

    Supreme Court decisions are crucial, but they are not the final word. It’s our duty as American citizens to keep pushing back, through all three branches of government, against any proposal that violates the Constitution. That’s the way to make sure our union can endure for another 225 years. Recently, … More

    Keeping Judges Out of the Foreign Policy Arena

    This week, the Supreme Court issued a historic decision that will help prevent U.S. courts (and activist judges) from interfering in foreign policy issues that are—and should be—the constitutional prerogative of the executive and legislative branches. Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum involved the Alien Tort Statute (ATS), which was passed … More

    Another Supreme Chance to Ban Discrimination

    On Monday, the Supreme Court agreed to review an important case on race and sex discrimination (also known as affirmative action) that will give it another chance to overturn a court of appeals ruling and confirm that discrimination is always wrong. Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action is an … More

    Filibuster Deal Restricts Senators' Rights to Debate Judicial Nominees

    This afternoon, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) announced a potential filibuster deal that, among other problematic provisions, limits post-cloture debate on federal district court nominees (and non-Cabinet-level officials). Senators currently have up to 30 hours of post-cloture debate on the merits of … More

    Chen, Butler and Schroeder: Three Judicial Nominees Up In Senate

    At its Executive Business Meeting on February 4, 2010, the Senate Judiciary Committee sent the nominations of Edward Chen, Louis Butler, Mary Smith, and Christopher Schroeder to the floor for consideration by the Senate. President Obama resubmitted those nominations in January after the Senate adjourned in December without acting on … More