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    Why Japan Should Reengineer Innovation

    The Japanese are good at innovation. It was their reengineering techniques that propelled them to a top world competitor in the 1980s. But since stagnation began 20 years ago, Japan’s skill of innovating is still only good. It needs to be great. Most economies can be categorized by four characteristics: … More

    U.S.-Brazil Relations: Where Do We Go from Here?

    In an unusual move, Dilma Rousseff, president of Brazil, canceled a state visit to the U.S., citing her discontent with the Obama Administration’s response in the wake of National Security Agency (NSA) spying allegations. This embarrassing snub should force the White House to redress its foreign policy toward the region. … More

    An Opportunity for Greater U.S.-Nigeria Ties

    President Obama will meet with the Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan tonight on the margins of the U.N General Assembly in New York. Counterterrorism and energy security should be at the top of the meeting’s discussion agenda, along with Nigeria’s greater economic integration within West Africa and the continent. The recent … More

    Obama’s MCC Rewards Bad Behavior in El Salvador

    Last week, the U.S. government’s Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) approved a five-year, $277 million foreign aid compact with El Salvador. But, as Mary O’Grady reports in The Wall Street Journal, since the ruling FMLN party came to power in 2009, El Salvador has become poorer, less democratic, and less free. … More

    A Swedish (Economic) Lesson for President Obama in One Chart

    President Obama is making the first ever bilateral visit to Sweden by a sitting U.S. President. As The Heritage Foundation and Swedish think tank Timbro discussed in a recent Google Hangout, the President should learn from Sweden that advancing economic freedom, not big-government policies, is the driver of economic dynamism. … More

    Morning Bell: Is America Still the Land of Labor?

    For all the talk these days of how to revive our supposedly moribund American Dream, it took a college dropout-turned-actor to state the obvious. “I believe that opportunity looks a lot like work,” Ashton Kutcher recently said at the Teen Choice Awards. “I never had a job in my life that I … More

    Energy: As Mexico Finally Enters the 21st Century, Obama Parties Like It’s 1938

    Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto recently announced the first, very timid steps to take Mexico’s energy sector—famously nationalized in 1938 by then-President Lázaro Cárdenas—forward into the 21st century. Meanwhile, President Obama seems intent on taking U.S. energy back to 1938—the original heyday for New Deal big-government types. Peña Nieto’s proposal … More

    Principled Stand of the U.S. with the Baltics Still Resonates Today

    Tomorrow, the leaders of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania will meet at the White House with President Barack Obama. The joint meeting provides an opportunity for the United States to reaffirm its commitment to its allies in Eastern Europe, specifically the Baltic States, which have continued to make significant strides towards … More

    Cooperation with Mexico: Key to Border Security and Stopping Transnational Crime

    According to recent reports, the U.S. is in talks with Mexico to strengthen security along Mexico’s southern border. The effort reportedly includes a three-level security system for Mexico’s border with Belize and Guatemala to stop human trafficking, drug running, and other gang-related activity. Stopping such activities is critical to not … More

    Economic Freedom: Unleashing the Potential of the World’s Poor

    When the government gets in the way, sometimes even the hardest-working people get stuck in poverty. In Nepal, where more than one-quarter of the population lives below the poverty line, small local shops known as Kirana Pasals are forced to operate in the informal, black market economy because of high … More