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    Equal Pay Act: No Need for a Next Generation

    Today, the Equal Pay Act becomes middle aged. This law made it unlawful to pay women lower wages based on sex. It was passed in the early 1960s, a time when there were far fewer women in the workforce. Today they make up nearly half of the workforce. Given the … More

    Equal Pay Act at 50: The Myth of the Gender Wage Gap

    Today marks the 50th anniversary of the Equal Pay Act. Signed into law by John F. Kennedy in 1963, the act ruled it unlawful to pay women lower wages based on sex. Women all across the United States have a great deal to celebrate because of what they have accomplished … More

    DOJ and Department of Education Mandate Orwellian Speech Restrictions on College Campuses

    Last week, the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) Civil Rights Division and the Department of Education (ED) Office for Civil Rights issued a joint letter memori­­­alizing an “agreement” with the University of Montana relating to Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and Title IV of the Civil … More

    Another Supreme Chance to Ban Discrimination

    On Monday, the Supreme Court agreed to review an important case on race and sex discrimination (also known as affirmative action) that will give it another chance to overturn a court of appeals ruling and confirm that discrimination is always wrong. Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action is an … More

    Redefining Marriage Threatens Religious Liberty

    Religious liberty doesn’t stop at the church doors. The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, the nonpartisan public-interest law firm dedicated to protecting the free expression of all religions, filed an amicus brief with the Supreme Court making the case that legal recognition of same-sex relationships as marriages creates hazards for … More

    Morning Bell: Voting Rights at the Supreme Court Today

    To understand what’s going on in the Supreme Court today, we have to go back in time. The year was 1965. Hundreds of people gathered in Selma, Alabama, to march for black Americans’ right to vote. Some states, especially in the South, had set up obstacles to voting, such as … More

    Burmese Refugees Face Discrimination, Human Trafficking

    Thousands of Rohingya are fleeing Burma and seeking refuge in Bangladesh, Malaysia, and Thailand only to find themselves persecuted, trafficked, or homeless. Blatant segregation and discrimination against the Rohingya has occurred since Burma’s independence in the late 1940s, but recent tension between Buddhist and Muslim groups has led to an … More

    The Giglio Smear: When Faith Is Called Bigotry

    Pastor Louie Giglio, whose Passion Movement has raised millions of dollars toward ending sex trafficking, removed himself from offering the benediction at President Obama’s second inauguration after previous statements on biblical sexual ethics came to light. On January 9, the liberal political blog Think Progress brought attention to a sermon … More

    A Win for Religious Freedom in Illinois

    On Tuesday, the state of Illinois declined to appeal a recent loss in the Illinois Court of Appeals, which ruled in late September that the state cannot force pharmacists and pharmacies to stock and dispense abortion-inducing drugs in violation of their religious beliefs. The Illinois Attorney General’s decision marks the … More

    Morning Bell: Disabilities Treaty Just Another U.N. Power Grab

    International treaties sound like a good idea, especially when they claim to protect vulnerable people. The problem is, America already does more than any other country to ensure equal rights for its people—and the United Nations just wants the power to interfere in American law. The Senate is now considering … More