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    B-61 Remains Relevant for U.S. Security

    Efforts to eliminate funding for the B-61 gravity bomb threaten to undermine U.S. deterrence, writes Thomas Karako, director of the Center for the Study of American Democracy at Kenyon College. Components of the B-61 weapon, the U.S.’s most visible commitment to European security, are reaching the end of their service … More

    Making the Case for a Complete Nuclear Triad

    As Russia revitalizes its nuclear arsenal and rogue nations North Korea and Iran pursue nuclear capability, America’s nuclear triad is critical to national security. However, opponents of the triad argue that it is a Cold War relic that has become too expensive and that deterrence can still be achieved by … More

    Minimum Deterrence: Examining the Evidence

    The minimum deterrence posture, based on the premise that few nuclear weapons deter all adversaries, is unsubstantiated by historical evidence and contrary to vital U.S. national security interests, according to a new report by the National Institute for Public Policy (NIPP). NIPP president Keith Payne, NIPP senior scholar Ambassador Robert … More

    U.S. Nuclear Weapons Relevant for Today’s World

    U.S. nuclear weapons remain relevant for the security challenges the U.S. faces after the end of the Cold War, writes Georgetown’s Matthew Kroenig in his article “Think Again: American Nuclear Disarmament.” “Nostalgia for simpler times can be seductive,” he says, “but the United States needs a nuclear force that can … More

    Reduced Nuclear Arms: Slimmer, but Not Smarter

    Would reducing U.S. nuclear arms save taxpayers money? Former Pentagon policy official David J. Trachtenberg responded to Stimson Center co-founder Barry Blechman’s piece arguing that it would. Trachtenberg points out that the money saved by reducing the nuclear stockpile is “negligible compared to the costs of building up [the] conventional … More

    House Pushes Back on Obama’s Nuclear Disarmament Agenda

    The House Armed Services Committee’s (HASC) National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) advances U.S. national interests when it comes to U.S. nuclear weapons. The bill prohibits elimination of the nuclear triad and limits availability of funds for further nuclear reductions. The President’s previous arms control treaty, the New Strategic Arms Reduction … More

    Cutting the U.S. Nuclear Arsenal Won’t Make Us Safer

    President Obama is considering further unilateral cuts in the nuclear arsenal, but his disarmament policies will do nothing to make the world a safer place. In a newly published paper, “Slouching Toward Zero,” Dr. Robert Butterworth, president of Aries Analytics, charges that the modernization of U.S. nuclear forces, while remaining … More

    Morning Bell: What Reagan Knew About Missile Defense

    It would take only 33 minutes for a missile to reach the U.S. from anywhere in the world. That’s a sobering thought when North Korea is taunting America with threatening video propaganda about its nuclear capabilities and Iran is advancing its nuclear program. In response to these threats, the Obama … More

    Foreign Policy: No Apology for American Greatness

    While conservatives might be in a bit of a post-election funk, this is no time to compromise our principles—especially on foreign policy and national security, where Team Obama’s record has been less than stellar to say the least. Rather, now is the time to dig deep and fight for the … More

    "Horses and Bayonets" Remark Is a Disrespectful Oversimplification

    Last night, President Obama generated tremendous Internet buzz with his “horses and bayonets” remark. While the U.S. Armed Forces have of course advanced technologically, the President’s statement is a disservice to the sailors and Marines who rely on our robust fleet every day, and it dramatically oversimplifies the importance of … More