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    The Health of Tyrants Chavez and Castro Worries Venezuela and Cuba

    Just weeks after his October presidential electoral victory, Hugo Chavez is returning to Cuba for unspecified cancer treatment. The brief announcement of his return appears to contradict Chavez’s campaign reassurances that he had conquered cancer. Prior to the October 7 elections, Chavez, president since 1999, did all in his power … More

    The Heritage Guide to the Electoral College

    Abigael Evans should be happy. She’s the four-year-old who’s so sick of the election that she cried. Her tears went viral. It should all be over soon, although we’ll have to wait a bit for the official tabulation of the Electoral College. Here’s how it works: Each state has a … More

    The Constitution and Our Democracy...er, Republic

    It’s usually considered bad form to show up late for a party and then trash the guest of honor. But at a recent Constitution Day event (held two days after the actual Constitution Day), Harvard law professor Michael Klarman attempted not to praise our nation’s governing charter but to bury … More

    True Democracy: Principles over Process

    Many around the world have been quick to tout the Arab Spring, with its deposition of tyrants and the occurrence of elections, as democracy in action for parts of the Middle East. But in places like Egypt, civilian rule and fair elections appear more and more likely not to happen … More

    More Than Just a Statue: Ronald Reagan's Legacy in Georgia

    Recently, a statue of Ronald Reagan was unveiled in the Georgian capital of Tbilisi. Since I am in Georgia this week speaking at a conference and meeting with Georgian officials, I thought I would take the time to visit it. The statue sits just above the Kura River, which snakes … More

    In Cuba, Pope Disappoints Friends of Democracy

    On March 28, Pope Benedict XVI completed his six-day visit to Mexico and Cuba. In both stops, the Pope sought to propagate the faith and demonstrate the connectivity between faith and the moral and spiritual conditions of modern man. In Cuba, the Pope did not visit with those who speak … More

    Burmese Elections an Encouraging Signal—No More, No Less

    For months now, many encouraging signals have been coming from Burma’s military-backed regime. The list of reforms over the last year is well-known: release of hundreds of political prisoners, relaxation of press censorship and return of exiled journalists, legal amendments to allow for labor unions and strikes, ceasefires with ethnic … More

    Bahrain vs. the Media

    Since the uprising erupted last year, Bahrain has continued to experience unrest. Despite continuing reforms by the government, the opposition movement has steadily hardened its stance against the al-Khalifa monarchy. Last weekend, protests in Bahrain escalated in one of the most violent confrontations between the opposition movement and police. Tens … More

    Obama's New "Fairness Doctrine" and the American Ideal

    “Economic fairness” is expected to be the topic of President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address on Tuesday night, during which he will likely sound the same populist notes of progressivism that America heard last month in his speech in Osawatomie, Kansas. Fairness, though, is in the eye of … More

    Who REINS in Washington Anyway?

    Congress rarely considers a bill that would change the way Washington works. But this is exactly what the Regulations from the Executive In Need of Scrutiny (REINS) Act would do. The REINS Act (H.R.10) would require Congress to approve all “major” regulations—those costing $100 million or more annually—before they take … More