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    No More Band-Aids for Defense Acquisition

    Last week Admiral Mullen highlighted the national security consequences posed by the national debt as he keynoted Concerned Veterans for America’s fifth and final event in their Defend & Reform Breakfast series. This series outlined the ways Americans can contribute to freedom by advancing reform. Reiterating his now famous warning, … More

    No Longer Science Fiction: Lasers Could Defend Navy Ships in the Near Future

    Laser weapons have long appeared in science fiction stories and James Bond films as futuristic, hypothetical technology. Yet the U.S. Navy has made technological and economic advances in lasers, and they could soon become a reality onboard its ships. Lexington Institute president Loren Thompson recently wrote an article advocating for … More

    3 Things You Don't Need Robert Gates's Book to Know

    Excerpts from a new tell-all book made quite a splash in Washington yesterday. Former Defense Secretary Robert Gates apparently blasts President Obama on foreign policy and the U.S. military in his upcoming book, Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War. But as Heritage’s James Jay Carafano said, “You don’t need … More

    The United States Should Lead with Power and Purpose on China

    Recently I posted here on China’s unprecedented military buildup and the reasons for it. The Chinese Communist leaders are pursuing a “coercive but non-kinetic” policy – essentially bullying the smaller countries in the region with the threat of armed conflict – and rapidly developing the means to deny the American military access to … More

    China’s Growing Navy

    China’s declaration of an air defense identification zone over Japanese-administered waters in the East China Sea and confrontation with an American guided missile cruiser is a useful reminder of China’s growing naval strength. In a recently released report, The Heritage Foundation noted that China’s navy is by far the largest … More

    “Minimum Deterrence” Doesn’t Work as a Defense Strategy

    Nikolas Gvosdev, a professor of national security affairs at the U.S. Naval War College, argued in favor of a defense strategy known as “minimum deterrence.” Minimum deterrence was posited as making the most strategic and ethical sense in today’s world. This policy, which relies on flawed assumptions, would be wholly … More

    Readiness Cuts Mean No Jumps for Some Paratroopers

    Facing deep cuts to defense spending, the U.S. Army must keep some of its most elite paratroopers on the ground. This marks an entry on a growing list of readiness concerns the U.S. military is dealing with. The Obama Administration ordered these cuts in its 2012 Defense Strategic Guidance, a … More

    Defense Over-Regulations Costing More Than Just Dollars

    Over the past 50 years, Congress has had a propensity to impose restrictions on the Department of Defense acquisition process in ways that centralize authority. House Armed Service Committee vice chairman Mac Thornberry (R–TX) is trying to change all that by spearheading new efforts to reform the byzantine process. But … More

    Obama's Disastrous Stewardship of America's Armed Forces

    Capt. Tom Shanahan didn’t need a full crew. At least, that’s what the Pentagon told him. After all, his ship—the USS Canisteo—was in port for repairs. As the months passed, the Navy assigned more and more Canisteo crew members elsewhere. By the time repairs were complete, Shanahan didn’t have enough … More

    Army Chief Raises Serious Readiness Concerns

    As the U.S. Army prepares for future contingencies around the world, it continues to find its readiness at the mercy of “time and money,” Army chief of staff General Ray Odierno said last week at an AUSA conference. Budgetary pressures have forced the Army and the other armed services to … More