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  • cold war

    Dictator Castro Now In Charge of Latin American Pro-Democracy Group

    In Santiago, Chile, on January 28, the new regional body, the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC), passed its rotating presidency to Cuba’s dictator General Raul Castro. CELAC, according to prime backer Hugo Chavez of Venezuela, is part of a historic project to build a Latin American/Caribbean union … More

    Shining the Light of Transparency on U.S. Public Diplomacy

    Transparency in government took a huge step forward on January 3. On that day, President Obama signed into law the Smith–Mundt Modernization Act as an amendment to the 2013 Defense Authorization Bill. With the new revision, State Department foreign programming may be broadcast in the United States, though it may … More

    President Obama Should Not Unilaterally Reduce U.S. Nuclear Arsenal

    Recently, the Obama Administration has come under fire for potentially making unilateral cuts to the United States nuclear arsenal. Such unilateral cuts were proposed in the International Security Advisory Board’s (ISAB) November report on “Options for Implementing Additional Nuclear Force Reductions.” Legal arguments aside, there are many problematic assumptions that … More

    50 Years Later: Lessons on Escalation from the Cuban Missile Crisis

    This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, a major event in the Cold War. With the U.S. and the Soviet Union on the brink of what many feared was nuclear conflict, both President John F. Kennedy and Premier Nikita Khrushchev fumbled for a way to end … More

    50 Years Later: What the Cuban Missile Crisis Teaches Us About Nuclear Policy

    Fifty years ago, the world came to the brink of nuclear war. On October 14, 1962, U.S. policymakers learned that the Soviet Union was building missile bases in Cuba, which would have allowed Moscow to attack anywhere in the continental United States within minutes. An international crisis followed, and while … More

    Nuclear Proliferation Still Leads to Instability

    In his recent article in Foreign Affairs, “Why Iran Should Get the Bomb: Nuclear Balancing Would Mean Stability,” Kenneth N. Waltz is swimming upstream against the consensus position regarding the instability stemming from nuclear proliferation. In this case, the consensus position is right, and Waltz is wrong. The international nuclear … More

    Deterioration of Nuclear Infrastructure Undermines U.S. Security

    Speaking to the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, D.C., last Wednesday, the head of U.S. Strategic Command, Air Force General Robert Kehler, described the U.S. nuclear deterrent as being “in really bad shape.” Years of neglect and lack of funding after the Cold War have weakened the nuclear infrastructure, … More

    NATO Summit 2012: Without New Investment by Europeans, NATO's Future Is in Doubt

    At the NATO Summit in Chicago this weekend, leaders will gather to discuss a number of issues facing the alliance. Top of the agenda will be Afghanistan, improving NATO’s military capabilities, and extending NATO’s partnerships with regional and global partners. However, nothing agreed at the summit will matter if America’s … More

    VIDEO: Military's Aging Aviation Force Puts America at Risk

    The youngest B-52 bomber rolled off the assembly line 50 years ago. Remarkably, it’s still flying. Like many of the aircraft still used by the U.S. military, the B-52 is telltale example of America’s geriatric aviation force. At a time when our military is asked to do more with less, … More

    Protect America, Not New START

    Recently, Daryl Kimball and Tom Collina, both of the Arms Control Association, criticized the House Armed Services Committee (HASC) for taking hostage the implementations of the New Strategic Arms Reductions Treaty (New START) in order to provide necessary funding for the National Nuclear Security Administration. The article misrepresents facts. New … More