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    Chinese Investment: Danger or Opportunity?

    Growing Chinese investment around the world is a major international economic development. In the U.S., the story is how limited Chinese investment is beyond government bonds. Limitations on Chinese investment in the U.S. are not imposed by the PRC. Other than bonds, the PRC invests primarily in natural resources, and … More

    To START or Not To START? Should It Even Be a Question?

    In an interview with National Journal (subscription necessary) Senator Richard Lugar (R–IN), responds to a series of objections to the new START Treaty and outlines why he believes ratification is necessary. Sen. Lugar addresses the question of tactical nuclear weapons, yet gives a less than satisfactory response. He states, “A … More

    US Should Show Strength, Not Weakness in Korean Military Exercises

    This week, the U.S. and South Korea have initiated extensive joint military exercises and senior-level security meetings to project an image of strong solidarity, resolve, and deterrence to North Korea. Under normal circumstances, these actions would have accomplished their purpose. Although the robust naval exercises display formidable military capabilities, they … More

    Public Diplomacy with Chinese Characteristics

    A former United States Ambassador to Thailand tells of being asked to contribute to a local university in Bangkok that wanted to set up an “America corner” in its library—nothing more than a computer station and a few shelves of informational material. When he arrived for the unveiling, however, he … More

    New START Will Not Make Us Safer Tomorrow: A Response to Senator Carl Levin

    Senator Carl Levin (D–MI), Chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, released an op-ed last week arguing that the new START Treaty is good for the U.S. and the world. This follows similar op-eds from Sen. John Kerry (D–MA) and Sen. Richard Lugar (R–IN). Given the number of such publications … More

    Send Trade Critics Back to School

    Critics of free trade have used funny math to mislead Americans for decades. It may be time to send these critics back to grade school, so they can learn how to add and subtract. Consider the following interpretation of this May’s international trade statistics: “Oil and consumer goods from China … More

    Tackling the Challenges of the Broadcasting Board of Governors

    The new Broadcasting Board of Governors, announced on Friday by the Obama White House, have their work cut out for them. For a variety of not very satisfactory reasons, the U.S. broadcasting entities (Voice of America, Radio Free Europe, et al.) on whom the federal government spends $745 million a … More

    Renewed License for Google, but Censorship in China Remains

    Google just announced that its Internet licensed was renewed by the Chinese government. Google originally automatically redirected google.cn users to their Hong Kong site, google.com.hk. Now, China is forcing users to click on the link for Google Hong Kong (or almost anywhere on the page) on the google.cn page. Google … More

    Inaugurating a New Era in the U.S. Philippines Alliance

    Americans do not think about the Philippines as much as they have in eras past.  At the end of the 19th century and beginning of 20th, we fought a war there, first to liberate the Philippines from Spain, and then to establish an American colony.  Over the last 100 years, … More

    Hugo Chavez’s Socialism: Beg, Borrow or Steal

    Venezuela’s populist authoritarian President continues to battle a slumping economy, high inflation and faltering popular approval ratings. With the national oil company (PDVSA) the chief lifeline of his regime, Chavez will literally beg, borrow or steal to keep pumping oil. Chavez’s nationalization mania took off in earnest in 2007.   Last year, … More