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  • Bureau of Economic Analysis

    Economic Growth to Remain Subpar Because of Policy Uncertainty

    The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) will soon release its first estimate for how fast the economy grew in the fourth quarter of 2013 and for the entire year of 2013. The last report showed the economy moving up sharply in the third quarter of 2013 compared to where it … More

    Economy Still Growing Too Slowly

    The Bureau of Economic Analysis’s (BEA) first estimate of economic growth for the third quarter of this year shows an economy that continues to grow at a plodding pace. According to BEA, the economy grew at 2.8 percent from July 1 through September 30. This was slightly faster than the … More

    Economic Growth Remains Too Slow Because of Policy Uncertainty

    Today’s report on gross domestic product (GDP) shows that not much changed in the economy during the second quarter. The Bureau of Economic Analysis’s initial estimate shows that economic growth was just 1.7 percent from April 1 through June 30—well below the rate the economy should be growing this far … More

    Sequestration Helps Force Needed Spending Cuts and Enables Private-Sector Jobs

    The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released a letter this week describing how canceling sequestration in 2014 would affect the economy. The CBO dutifully plugged the numbers into its economic model, and the model gave the result it was written to give: more government spending equals more output in the government … More

    Trade Deficit Worry Warts Ignore $26 TRILLION in Foreign Investment

    The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) recently reported that job-creating foreign investment in the United States is approaching $26 trillion. In the first quarter of 2013, the value of foreign investment in the United States increased by $394 billion. That includes investments in U.S. stocks and bonds, government securities, … More

    Does the United States Really Have a Trade Deficit?

    In 2012, $3.4 trillion came into the United States through trade and investment, and $3.4 trillion left, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). Every dollar Americans sent to people in other countries was balanced by a dollar sent back to the United States: 64 cents for U.S. exports, … More

    One of America’s Biggest Exports: Treasury Securities

    The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) recently released statistics on U.S. exports for January, but failed to mention of one of the biggest U.S. “exports”—federal Treasury securities. In 2012, the government financed its deficit spending by selling $382 billion in Treasury securities to foreign buyers. To put that in perspective, … More

    Attention, Reporters: A Trade Deficit Is Not Bad

    The latest trade deficit figures are out, and, as always, most reports fail to accurately explain what these numbers mean. Consider the following widely reported statement: A narrower trade gap boosts growth because it means U.S. companies are earning more from overseas sales while U.S. consumers and businesses are spending … More

    Trade Deficit Increases. . . or Does It?

    The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) just announced that the country’s current account deficit for 2011 was $473.4 billion. This number includes transactions like exports and imports. Cue the “sky is falling” headlines. However, the BEA did not point out that the overall U.S. international transactions deficit was $0. … More