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    Defense Budget Competing with Entitlement Spending: A Crisis Point

    Today, the threats to our national security are complex, fluid, and hard to fully comprehend. This requires a serious look at what the U.S. can do to affect events worldwide that would produce outcomes favorable to our interests, rather than allowing other nations to drive events, some of which are … More

    Fort Hood Victims Call It What It Was: Terrorism

    Three years after a man with ties to Islamic radical groups killed 12 people while screaming “Allah Akbar” over and over at Fort Hood Army base, the U.S. Department of Defense still refuses to call it an act of terrorism. Instead, the incident is classified as “workplace violence,” despite evidence … More

    Cybersecurity Flaws at Department of Labor Continue the Trend of Government Cyber Failures

    A recent investigation into the Department of Labor’s (DOL) secure information systems revealed “very serious” cybersecurity flaws. Together with many other cybersecurity breaches and failures in the federal government, it is clear the government should not be put in charge of cybersecurity regulation of the private sector. The DOL failures … More

    Ignoring the Terrorist Threat Doesn't Make It Go Away

    Last week, President Obama joked to guests at the Alfred E. Smith Dinner in New York about the upcoming foreign policy debate: “Spoiler Alert: We got [Osama] bin Laden.” While this is indeed the highlight of the Administration’s foreign policy endeavors, President Obama’s failure to take a comprehensive approach to … More

    Key Facts About the Military Budget

    “Governor Romney’s plan calls for…$2 trillion in additional military spending that the military hasn’t asked for.” —President Obama, First Presidential Debate, October 3, 2012 The President has repeatedly attacked Governor Romney’s plan to restore baseline military budgets to roughly 4 percent of domestic product as unnecessary spending that the Joint … More

    Morning Bell: 5 Crucial Questions for the Presidential Foreign Policy Debate

    Tonight’s final presidential debate will focus solely on foreign policy. Moderator Bob Schieffer announced that the topics will be: “America’s Role in the World,” “Our Longest War—Afghanistan and Pakistan,” “Red Lines—Israel and Iran,” “The Changing Middle East and the New Face of Terrorism,” and “The Rise of China and Tomorrow’s … More

    3 Questionable Foreign Policy Statements in the Second Presidential Debate

    The second presidential debate is done, and the pundit debate regarding its meaning continues. President Obama made three questionable statements relating to national security, and as the foreign policy debate approaches on Monday, these are worth addressing: “I ended the war in Iraq.” This one is a stretch. The surge … More

    Debate Prep: The Changing Middle East and the New Face of Terrorism

    The final presidential debate, on foreign policy, is scheduled for Monday, October 22. Moderator Bob Schieffer announced that the topics will be: “America’s Role in the World,” “Our Longest War—Afghanistan and Pakistan,” “Red Lines—Israel and Iran,” “The Changing Middle East and the New Face of Terrorism,” and “The Rise of … More

    50 Years Later: The Soviets' Reckless Overreach in the Cuban Missile Crisis

    On October 16–28, the world is marking the 50th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, a standoff between the United States and the former Soviet Union that nearly ended in a nuclear war between the two superpowers. The confrontation of the Cold War still affects the relationship between the U.S. … More

    Debate 2012: Illegal Immigration and Driver's Licenses

    In last night’s presidential debate, Governor Mitt Romney said that if elected, he would eliminate “magnets” that attract people to illegally reside in the United States. One magnet that he mentioned was the ability of undocumented immigrants to obtain driver’s licenses. Luckily for Governor Romney, he would not need Congress … More