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    Chen Guangcheng’s Defense of Human Rights

    Distinguished human rights activist Chen Guangcheng called on world leaders to take action on religious oppression, forced abortion, and other human rights violations by China’s Communist government last week in a lecture delivered at Princeton University. Chen became famous for opposing China’s oppressive one-child policy. His inaugural address as a … More

    Egypt: Cuts to Aid Hurt U.S. National Interests

    This week’s cuts to military aid to Egypt have had negative consequences for U.S.–Egypt relations. Egyptian Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmy said Wednesday that the country is “in a delicate state reflecting the turmoil in the relationship and anyone who says otherwise is not speaking honestly.” Some experts worry that “the … More

    Iceland Charts a Course Away from the EU

    In September, Iceland decided to officially suspend accession talks with the European Union. The decision indicates that the island nation will likely seek to chart a course for itself outside the EU. While Iceland remains an official candidate for EU membership, the suspension of accession talks demonstrates a new way … More

    Asia Accounts for Two out of Three People Enslaved Worldwide

    The recently released Global Slavery Index reveals that there are an estimated 29.8 million people enslaved worldwide. Almost half of the index’s listed top offenders are from Asia. Mauritania, Haiti, and Pakistan have the highest prevalence of trafficking, but India, China, and Pakistan enslave the highest number of people. And … More

    Chinese Call for “De-Americanization” Is an Empty Suggestion

    A recent editorial in the Chinese newspaper Global Times called for “de-Americanization.” Concerned with the American government shutdown and the prospect of the debt ceiling not being raised, the editorial argued that the United States is too irresponsible to be allowed to remain the dominant power. “Such alarming days when … More

    Obstacles to Peace in South Sudan

    Even as an independent country, peace remains elusive for South Sudan. Decades of civil war, genocide, complex ethnic relations, and deep-seated distrust continue to plague its relationship with Sudan. Despite a peace agreement in 2005 that failed to adequately deliver “diversity in unity” and eventually led to the creation of … More

    Southeast Asia: In Obama’s Absence, China Takes Initiative

    Reactions to President Obama’s absence from this year’s Asia–Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum highlighted the stakes of American leadership in Southeast Asia and shined a spotlight on China’s rising challenge to U.S. influence in the region. Amidst the ongoing government shutdown, President Obama abruptly canceled his highly anticipated trip to … More

    Rapid Response Force Relies on Permanent U.S. Base in Europe

    The U.S. Army’s 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team (BCT) recently established an Army Contingency Response Force—a rapidly deployable company-size unit—to respond to crises in Europe and Northern Africa within a day. Military leadership created this unit “in response to a requirement from the Department of the Army to make sure … More

    Internet Freedom in Decline

    The recently published Freedom on the Net 2013 report by Freedom House shows a negative movement worldwide, even in the countries listed as “free.” This has been a persistent trend for the three years Freedom House has conducted the survey. The tug of war between governments and Internet users continues, … More

    Asia: What’s at Stake for America

    The Heritage Foundation’s Asian Studies Center recently released “A New View of Asia: 24 Charts That Show What’s at Stake for America,” an annual publication highlighting the critical importance of U.S.–Asia relations. The report documents in graphic form important economic, geographic, military, and political trends in the region and emphasizes … More