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    NATO: Is America AWOL?

    NATO will conduct one of its largest military exercises since the end of the Cold War, but the U.S. is planning to send only a token contribution. This poor commitment will not go unnoticed by American allies in Eastern Europe. Exercise Steadfast Jazz will take place in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, … More

    Brazil’s Internet: A Showdown of Ends and Means

    Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff wants to free Brazil’s Internet access from U.S. domination. Rousseff and the Brazilian government seek to accomplish this “cyber sovereignty” by strong-arming U.S. companies into establishing local data centers, laying a new fiber-optic link from Brazil through South Africa to Asia, and partnering with Russia on … More

    Government-Sanctioned Censorship in Argentina

    In a crushing blow to freedom of expression, Argentina’s supreme court upheld government-mandated restrictions on media. The court declared that President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner’s government has an obligation to prevent public media companies from exercising what the court calls a monopoly over public discourse. In 2009, Argentina’s legislature passed … More

    Bust of Winston Churchill Dedicated in U.S. Capitol

    Congress dedicated a bust of Winston Churchill, one of the greatest leaders of the 20th century and an honorary American citizen, in a ceremony this week in the magnificent Statuary Hall of the U.S. Capitol. The event was a powerful tribute to Churchill’s leadership and to his great legacy in … More

    Burma Is Not Ready for Mil-to-Mil Cooperation with the U.S.

    Has Burma made enough reforms to have military-to-military cooperation with the U.S.? Congressman Steve Chabot (R–OH) says no. In a recent speech at The Heritage Foundation, Chabot noted that the Obama Administration has been too hasty to reward Burma for its reforms and is unclear on what its policies in … More

    "60 Minutes" Returns Spotlight to Benghazi

    With Sunday’s 60 Minutes segment on Benghazi, CBS renewed interest in a calamity that the Obama Administration had hoped would be long forgotten. However, until the American people, Congress, and the families of the four American victims of the terrorist attack on September 11, 2012, have more and better answers … More

    Argentinian President’s Life-Threatening Surgery Could Mean End for Party Majority

    Argentinian President Cristina Fernandez’s Victory Front coalition party suffered a tremendous loss in Sunday’s elections. Fernandez had hoped her party would win to a two-thirds majority in the congress, but now her party holds barely 50 percent of the seats. Fernandez’s campaign began losing momentum a few weeks ago when … More

    Still No African Leader Worthy of the Ibrahim Award

    For the fourth time in five years the Mo Ibrahim Foundation has failed to find a suitable candidate for the world’s most valuable individual award ($5 million over 10 years, then $200,000 per year for life): the Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership. Africa is home to some of the world’s … More

    Surging Piracy in the Gulf of Guinea Threatens U.S. Interests

    When pirates off the Nigerian coast abducted two Americans on an oil ship early Thursday morning, resulting news coverage focused U.S. public attention on surging piracy and lawlessness in the Gulf of Guinea. The kidnappings, however, are simply the latest reminder that the Gulf of Guinea has emerged as the … More

    From Dog’s Breakfast to Effective Communication: Can the BBG Transform Itself?

    After years of dysfunction, U.S. international broadcasting might be headed for better times as new members of the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG) settled into their responsibilities at the monthly board meeting last Wednesday. The competition in global communication has intensified as has the challenges facing the U.S. from Islamist … More