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    In Cristina Kirchner’s Argentina, Christmas Shoppers Are Muscled Aside by Looters

    Earlier this month, widespread looting broke out in “at least 19 of Argentina’s 23 provinces” when mobs took advantage of strikes by police demanding pay raises to match inflation” by “shattering glass doors and stealing everything from mattresses and mobile phones to prams and beer,” according to news reports in … More

    8 Americans to Remember This Christmas

    Christmas is a time for celebration and family. It should also be a time for reflection, appreciation for all we have, and remembrance of those who are in need. While most of us are gathering with loved ones, there are Americans being held prisoner in repressive countries around the world—often … More

    Q&A on the Trouble in South Sudan, the World’s Youngest Country

    South Sudan is dangerously close to becoming embroiled in a civil war. Rival factions within the national army clashed in the capital, resulting in an attempted coup at the beginning of the week. Two Indian U.N. peacekeepers have been killed in the Jonglei state. Over 500 people have been killed … More

    U.S. Should Support Postponing Elections in Bangladesh

    The Bangladesh government’s announcement late last month that parliamentary elections would be held on January 5 has been met with much opposition. Current Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina and the ruling Awami League party eliminated the constitutional requirement to install a neutral caretaker government to oversee elections, prompting the major opposition … More

    Cameron Rightly Draws a Line in the Sand on an EU Army

    The United Kingdom sagely blocked attempts by the European Union to develop an EU army at a recent EU Council meeting in Brussels. Long the dream of EU bureaucrats, an EU Army would undermine NATO, transatlantic cooperation, and, ultimately, European security. British Prime Minister David Cameron made it very clear … More

    Karzai Putting Afghanistan’s Future at Risk

    Afghan President Hamid Karzai is stubbornly refusing to sign the Bilateral Security Agreement (BSA) that will guarantee a residual U.S. force presence remains in Afghanistan post-2014. In doing so, he is ignoring the advice of U.S. and Iraqi officials and his own country’s tribal leaders—and jeopardizing the security of Afghanistan … More

    What Bitcoin Tells Us About Economic Freedom

    Chinese regulators are cracking down on Bitcoin, the anonymous open-source virtual currency. Officials at China’s central bank announced this week that they were banning all third-party payment processors from accepting Bitcoin, effectively shutting down the exchanges they are sold on. This is nothing new. Regulators have been interested in Bitcoin … More

    Benghazi: Let Eyewitnesses Tell the Whole Story

    As Congress laboriously extracts eyewitness accounts of the Benghazi terrorist attack, unexplained aspects of the tragedy are becoming clearer. Important case in point: the reports of an “order to stand down,” which prevented or at least delayed CIA security personnel from coming to the rescue of the diplomats at the … More

    Ecuador: Chevron Trial Illustrates Poor Investment Climate

    Press coverage of the just-concluded testimony phase of a racketeering trial in a New York federal court provides an excellent recent illustration of the behind-the-scenes maneuvering by President Rafael Correa of Ecuador and his government that has created disillusionment and a climate of mistrust among international investors. Two years ago … More

    Don’t Look to Hollywood for the Truth About Interpol

    This week on the big screen, martial arts master Jason Statham tangles with James Franco in Homefront. Statham’s on-screen backstory? He’s a British Interpol agent who retires to rural Louisiana, where he runs afoul of Franco and his gang. As a story, it’s not bad. But as a depiction of … More