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  • First Principles

    The future of liberty depends on reclaiming America’s first principles.

    The Summer That Gave Us the Constitution

    On this day in 1787, the Second Constitutional Convention embarked on a four month-long process that resulted in the masterful document responsible for shaping our country. Though battered and bruised today, the Constitution of the United States remains the framework for our nation’s government.  On May 25, 1787, however, the … More

    Is Plain Language the New Newspeak?

    “It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.” It may be a bit dramatic to quote the opening of George Orwell’s classic 1984, but there is something quite Orwellian about the effects of H.R.946 – a piece of legislation that passed last year without … More

    All They Are Saying Is: Give Peace a Chance

    When Miss Congeniality admitted that she really did want world peace, little did she know that the government would have an answer. A recently introduced bill would establish a Department of Peace to “reduce and prevent violence in the United States and internationally through peacebuilding and effective nonviolent conflict resolution.” … More

    The Founders on Intervention: American Military Action Abroad (1783-1860)

    Those who advocate strict non-interventionism usually intend it to mean that America should remain militarily uninvolved abroad except when there is a clear and imminent threat to U.S. territory. But this isolationist doctrine of non-interventionism is not in keeping with the founding principles of America’s early foreign policy. The Founding … More

    In the Service of Liberty: Understanding American Military Actions Abroad (1783-1860)

    There is quite a lot of debate over America’s proper role in the world at the moment. Some believe that America should return to an earlier, simpler, and more isolationist foreign policy. Perhaps this frame of mind makes it easier to advocate for significant cuts to military spending. To advance … More

    Nullification Fails, Again (This Time in North Dakota)

    In another victory for common sense and the Constitution, nullification has died a deserved death in North Dakota.  Sometimes you really can’t win for losing. The originally proposed “Nullification of Federal Health Care Reform Law” declared the Patient Protection and Affordability Care Act (Obamacare) to be unconstitutional, and so “invalid,” … More

    Unusual Gallantry and Extraordinary Fidelity: Celebrating the Purple Heart

    The valor of the Navy SEALs has received much attention in the last few days – as it should.  Today, on the anniversary of the first awarded Purple Hearts, we remember not only those who now serve, but all those who have already set this example of tenacity and bravery. … More

    California's Plight Confirms the Founders' Fears

    California is teetering on the edge of economic and social collapse. According to an Economist special report, this is largely the result of decisions to implement direct democracy reforms during the Progressive era, such as poplar recall, initiatives, propositions, and referenda — reforms that have “inflamed” the passions of the … More

    Five Memorable Inaugural Moments

    Today marks the anniversary of the first ever Presidential Inaugural Address under the Constitution. Let’s look at five that stand out. April 30, 1789, George Washington’s First Inaugural:  Neither the Constitution nor Congress required Washington to deliver an inaugural. But Washington set the bar high for his successors. The only … More

    Paul Revere with a Bedside Manner

    Dr. Hal C. Scherz’s tenacious work bringing together doctors across America to make the case for repealing Obamacare brought him a deserved reward earlier today. During a lunchtime ceremony in Dallas, the Atlanta physician accepted The Heritage Foundation’s 2011 Salvatori Prize for American Citizenship. Heritage annually presents the $25,000 prize, … More