• The Heritage Network
    • Resize:
    • A
    • A
    • A
  • Donate
  • Economics

    Japan’s Step Closer to TPP

    Today, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced that Japan will officially join the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). This comes a day after Prime Minister Abe received the okay to join TPP by his Liberal Democratic Party, a month after visiting President Obama and discussing the partnership, and more than a year since … More

    Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement One Year On: Solidifying a Partnership for the Future

    March 15 marks the first anniversary of the Korea–U.S. Free Trade Agreement (KORUS FTA). Over the past 12 months, a growing number of businesses in both countries have taken action to capitalize on the expanded opportunities created by the free flow of products, services, and ideas through the KORUS FTA. … More

    The Senate Continuing Resolution and Its Demons

    The massive spending bill released by the Senate this week suffers the same flaws as the measure the House passed last week: It spends too much, fails to protect national defense, and is full of unnecessary, wasteful spending. Like the House bill, the Senate’s continuing resolution (CR)—which is needed to … More

    Unemployment Remains a Stumbling Block in the Eurozone

    January’s unemployment numbers for the 17 countries of the eurozone has moved closer to 12 percent. This underscores the strong economic headwinds that face these member nations as they continue to grapple with an ongoing economic crisis. This same data reveals deep internal chasms within the eurozone between the economically … More

    One of America’s Biggest Exports: Treasury Securities

    The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) recently released statistics on U.S. exports for January, but failed to mention of one of the biggest U.S. “exports”—federal Treasury securities. In 2012, the government financed its deficit spending by selling $382 billion in Treasury securities to foreign buyers. To put that in perspective, … More

    Attention, Reporters: A Trade Deficit Is Not Bad

    The latest trade deficit figures are out, and, as always, most reports fail to accurately explain what these numbers mean. Consider the following widely reported statement: A narrower trade gap boosts growth because it means U.S. companies are earning more from overseas sales while U.S. consumers and businesses are spending … More

    Post-Chávez, Caribbean Should Snub PetroCaribe

    As some Venezuelans mourn the death of populist President Hugo Chávez, their northern neighbors in the Caribbean Basin shouldn’t shed a tear. In 2005, members of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) sold out on free markets for the price of Chávez’s oil diplomacy by signing up for PetroCaribe, a financing agreement … More

    Advancing Economic Freedom: Leading from Behind Doesn’t Work

    Advancing economic freedom around the world has markedly stagnated in recent years, particularly due to the lack of America’s leadership, says Terry Miller, chief editor of The Heritage Foundation’s Index of Economic Freedom, in a recent interview with the Langley Intelligence Group Network. According to Miller: Historically, the United States … More

    Debt Drag: Krugman, Konczal Miss the Point

    On their respective blogs, economists Mike Konczal and Paul Krugman criticize the widely cited finding that a nation’s debt above 90 percent of its gross domestic product (GDP) slows economic growth. They presume that the limitations of one study by Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff mean that its warning can … More

    America’s Next Trade Chief Should Focus on Promoting Greater Trade Freedom

    Senator Max Baucus (D–MT), chairman of Senate Finance Committee, urged strong and unrelenting political leadership in pursuing a comprehensive free trade pact between the U.S. and the European Union. He highlighted the importance of choosing an effective and experienced leader as America’s next trade czar in his recent Financial Times … More