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  • Liberty’s Champions from Hong Kong

    Anson Chan, the final Chief Secretary of Hong Kong under British rule and the first after the turnover to the Chinese, is a model of practicality and moderation. Martin Lee, founding chairman of Hong Kong’s Democratic Party, is the city’s revered, chief democratic activist. They came to Washington together last … More

    Hope is Not an Asia Policy

    State of the Union addresses are generally expressions of hope.  And yes, it would be nice if Asia was all economic opportunity and competition.  Indeed, the economic opportunities in Asia for the U.S. are great. But a shadow of doubt is growing over the region. The threat that doubt poses … More

    Devastation in the Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan: A Call for Help

    At least 1,774 people have been confirmed dead after Typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines last Friday. Estimates suggest that many thousands are dead and at least 800,000 displaced by the storm. While the storm is over, it has left millions of people in need of assistance. There are many ways … More

    Critical Questions for the Obama Administration on Burma–North Korea Ties

    In a discussion at Heritage last week examining U.S.–Burma military-to-military relations, former Senate Foreign Relations Committee professional staff Keith Luse laid out his personal opinion on the issue and raised 10 very specific questions for Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel regarding Burma’s relationship with North Korea. The Administration would do … More

    New Australian Leader Gives Hope to Conservatives Everywhere

    The Australian Liberal Party—“liberal” in the good way, like Adam Smith—and its coalition partner, the National Party, won in a landslide election over the weekend. Australian voters have made Liberal Party leader Tony Abbott the next prime minister of Australia with a projected majority of 89 out of 150 seats … More

    Southeast Asia and the Limits of American Soft Power

    Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel’s swing through Southeast Asia last week was notable not for the headlines and handshake photos he generated but the ones generated by the Chinese. Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi was hosting the 10 Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) foreign ministers in Beijing during the Secretary’s … More

    Don’t Trust Burma Promises—Enforce Them

    Burma’s president, Thein Sein, promised in London yesterday that all political prisoners in Burma would be released by year’s end. This is great news—if it happens. The promise could be genuine. There have, indeed, been positive political steps taken in Burma over the past two years, not the least of … More

    Administration Jumps the Language Barrier on Burma-North Korea Ties

    To achieve American aims in Burma, a policy is needed that clearly lays out the benchmarks of reform and consequences of Burma’s failure to meet them. Lately, these measurements have been anything but clear. The U.S. Department of the Treasury recently sanctioned Lieutenant General Thein Htay, the head of Burma’s … More

    Hill Concern over U.S.–Burma Military Engagement Grows

    First, the House of Representatives moved to draw a line on American engagement with the Burmese military. Now, the Senate is beginning to stir. The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that passed the House a couple of weeks ago contains language expressing the sense of Congress that “the Department of … More

    Burma: Drawing the Line on Military Relations

    Late last night, the House Armed Services Committee drew a line on American military relations with Burma. The committee passed an amendment to the annual National Defense Authorization Act offered by Representative Trent Franks (R–AZ) expressing the sense of Congress that “the Department of Defense should fully consider and assess … More