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  • Obama Needlessly Scares Seniors: Social Security Checks and the Debt Limit

    President Obama is needlessly scaring seniors by suggesting that their Social Security benefit checks may not arrive on time if the U.S. runs out of borrowing authority at the debt limit. The 57 million Americans who receive Social Security benefits should know that their benefits will not be affected—unless President … More

    Obama Debt Limit Proposal: We Spend More, You Pay More

    During remarks given after the passage of the Senate continuing resolution today, President Obama stressed once again his unwillingness to work with Republicans to find spending cuts before increasing the debt ceiling, while suggesting that he was otherwise eager to find a solution to America’s fiscal future. The President stated: … More

    Plan to Suspend Debt Limit Means Debt Would Rise to $17.8 Trillion

    Treasury Secretary Jack Lew announced a new debt ceiling deadline today, urging congressional lawmakers and the President to come to an agreement concerning the nation’s borrowing authority by October 17. Republicans are proposing a $1.1 trillion increase in the debt limit by suspending the cap through December 2014. The big … More

    Democrats Threaten Government Shutdown If They Don’t Get More Spending

    While much of the debate over government funding has centered around funding for the President’s unworkable health care law, Democrats’ appetite for more unnecessary federal spending has gotten much less attention. Democrats in the House are demanding more discretionary spending and have openly stated that they would prefer a government … More

    CBO Report's Facts Speak Louder Than Obama's Spending and Debt Crisis Denial

    The release of today’s Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report on the long-term budget outlook sends one message loud and clear: The U.S. spending and debt crisis is only getting worse. U.S. public debt doubled since before the recession and stands at a 50-year high today. The American public has not … More

    While Debt Crisis Looms, Washington Still Focused on Undoing Sequestration

    Lawmakers are on track to bargain away the one spending cut they got. The Washington Post reports that President Obama and a group of Republican Senators stalled on a budget deal on Thursday that revolved in part around the question of how to best renege on sequestration. Republicans want to … More

    Social Security Turns 78: What Was It Meant to Do?

    When President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Social Security into law on August 14, 1935, he referred to it as “a law which will give some measure of protection to the average citizen and to his family against the loss of a job and against poverty-ridden old age.” But today’s Social … More

    Two Years After Downgrade, U.S. Credit Rating Hasn’t Recovered—and Debt Is Worse

    Two years ago today, Standard & Poor’s downgraded the U.S. credit rating—and it hasn’t recovered since. Then, the downgrade came because the President and Congress failed to resolve the long-term spending and debt crisis. Now, the situation is even worse. Congress and the President should rein in out-of-control spending and … More

    Treasury Secretary Lew Ignores Real Debt Problem, Looming Crisis

    U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew suggested yesterday on NBC that “we have already done a lot of deficit reduction.” In reality, government spending and debt are out of control and getting worse. Negligence in fixing the entitlement programs—which consume more than half of the U.S. budget already—has left them fiscally … More

    Sequestration Helps Force Needed Spending Cuts and Enables Private-Sector Jobs

    The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released a letter this week describing how canceling sequestration in 2014 would affect the economy. The CBO dutifully plugged the numbers into its economic model, and the model gave the result it was written to give: more government spending equals more output in the government … More