• The Heritage Network
    • Resize:
    • A
    • A
    • A
  • Donate
  • Our National Portrait: The Great Seal of the United States

    The decision to adopt a national seal was made on July 4, 1776, the same day that the Continental Congress declared America’s independence from Great Britain. As a practical matter, America needed an official emblem to affix to diplomatic and official documents in order to signify its sovereignty as a … More

    Flag Day 2011: It's A Flag Worth Flying

    A few weeks ago at Louisiana State University, a small group of agitated students attempted to burn a U.S. flag in protest for some policy or other that they believed warranted the symbolic destruction of their country. Before they could get going, however, the protest was interrupted by other students … More

    The Founders on a Standing Navy: American Military Action Abroad (1783-1860)

    In 1794, President George Washington requested and Congress authorized the building of six frigates, a type of warship widely used at the time. The presence of a standing U.S. Navy was deemed necessary in order to defend American citizens and commerce from European wars and the Barbary Coast pirates. By … More

    A Tea Party Foreign Policy?

    The Tea Party has had an extraordinary effect on American domestic policy. They have raised interest in policy debates, rallied public opinion, and given it a voice on various spending and constitutional issues. On foreign policy, though, the Tea Party has been largely silent. But with the United States currently … More

    Rep. Paul Ryan: America Exceptional at Home and Abroad

    Paul Ryan (R-WI), the champion of necessary but unpopular fiscal reform, spoke this month about America’s exceptional political ideas and how they should be reflected in our foreign policy. In so doing he rejected isolationism and reinforced the Founders’ commitment to making America an indispensable nation for the cause of … More

    The Founders on Intervention: American Military Action Abroad (1783-1860)

    Those who advocate strict non-interventionism usually intend it to mean that America should remain militarily uninvolved abroad except when there is a clear and imminent threat to U.S. territory. But this isolationist doctrine of non-interventionism is not in keeping with the founding principles of America’s early foreign policy. The Founding … More

    In the Service of Liberty: Understanding American Military Actions Abroad (1783-1860)

    There is quite a lot of debate over America’s proper role in the world at the moment. Some believe that America should return to an earlier, simpler, and more isolationist foreign policy. Perhaps this frame of mind makes it easier to advocate for significant cuts to military spending. To advance … More

    California's Plight Confirms the Founders' Fears

    California is teetering on the edge of economic and social collapse. According to an Economist special report, this is largely the result of decisions to implement direct democracy reforms during the Progressive era, such as poplar recall, initiatives, propositions, and referenda — reforms that have “inflamed” the passions of the … More

    Hungary's New Constitution: Ideas have Consequences

    In what will surely be a publicity boon for Apple, especially among political scientists, Hungary’s new constitution is being written on an iPad. Thus far, this is one of the best known bits of information concerning Hungary’s current constitution drafting process. But lovers of liberty should take note of Hungary’s … More

    Bad Brew Alert: Tea Party Being Hijacked by Progressives

    Congressman Barney Frank (D-MA) recently asserted that there is a “potential alliance” forming between Progressive and Tea Party lawmakers on the issue of defense spending cuts. Others have also noted this opportunity:  “Arguably, the new Tea Party push on defense spending merely echoes long-standing progressive attacks on the Pentagon budget … More