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  • Storm Warning: The Gloomy Forecast for EMPs

    Almost a week after the D.C. area was pummeled with raging storms, many individuals are still suffering in the July heat without lights, phone lines, and, perhaps most importantly, air conditioning. In the immediate aftermath of this event, tens of thousands of Washingtonians, Marylanders, and Virginians were left without power. … More

    Congress Doesn't Get Homeland Security

    Last week, Congressmen Jerrold Nadler (D–NY), Edward Markey (D–MA), and Bennie Thompson (D–MS) publicly chastised the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in a New York Times op-ed, claiming that DHS has done little to counter the terrorist threat to maritime cargo security in recent years. While this couldn’t be much … More

    Another Cry for Common Sense Immigration Enforcement

    In an article in today’s Washington Examiner, senior political analyst Michael Barone argues that Monday’s Supreme Court decision in Arizona v. United States paves the way for the U.S. to implement sensible reform of our immigration laws, and he certainly got it right. Barone begins by arguing that while the … More

    Ten Years of Homeland Security Oversight: Time for Reform

    Ten years ago today, the House created a 13-member Select Committee on Homeland Security. The decision seemingly made a good deal of sense. With the memory of 9/11 still fresh, President George W. Bush had begun to call for a Cabinet-level department to carry out the nation’s homeland security mission. … More

    Cut off from Reality: Resuscitating U.S.-Cuba Policy

    Today, the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations will address the Castro regime’s stranglehold on Cuban civil society and how best to tackle the nation’s continued political repression. Congress deserves praise for highlighting this matter and drawing some much-needed attention to the need to reinvigorate U.S. commitment to the Cuban people … More

    Patting Down the TSA Bloat and Bureaucracy

    Tomorrow, the House Committee on Homeland Security will hold a hearing on “TSA’s Efforts to Fix Its Poor Customer Service Reputation and Become a Leaner, Smarter Agency.” In describing the hearing, chairman Mike Rogers (R–AL) wrote: Through years of high profile mistakes and poor public communications, TSA [the Transportation Security … More

    Bolivia: Iran's Newest Friend in Latin America

    Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez has long been Iran’s greatest ally in the Western Hemisphere, but as Chavez’s cancer grows and his country’s future becomes increasingly uncertain, Iran may need to find a new best friend in Latin America—and fast. Enter Bolivia. Since Iranian leader Mahmoud Ahmadinejad first visited Bolivia in 2007, … More

    Most Americans Agree: War on Terrorism Not Yet Won

    Last week, experts fired back at the assertion by an unnamed senior State Department official that “The war on terror is over.” Yet, according to a Rasmussen poll released today, it’s not just the experts who disagree. According to a telephone survey conducted by the well-known polling company, 79 percent … More

    Terrorproofing America: Worse Than Impossible

    The National Association of Postmasters of the United States (NAPUS) recently registered an odd complaint in a letter to U.S. Senators this past Sunday. This body of national security experts attempted to claim that the U.S. should not open delivery of first-class mail to private carriers because it would “expose … More

    Field of Dreams Meets Visa Waiver Reform

    “If you build it, they will come”—at least that’s what author Edward Alden argues in a recent Foreign Affairs article calling for the long-overdue expansion of the Visa Waiver Program (VWP). Between 2005 and 2010, 98 million visitors entered the United States from the 36 member nations of the VWP, … More