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  • Is America a Democracy or a Republic?

    According to the Wall Street protesters, American representative government has failed and therefore they are replacing it, “Since we can no longer trust our elected representatives to represent us rather than their large donors,” the Zuccotti Park occupiers explain, “we are creating a microcosm of what democracy really looks like.” … More

    Occupy Wall Street Is No Tea Party

    The past few years have witnessed the rise and fall of several left-leaning political fads, each touted as a response to the rise of the Tea Party Movement: the Coffee Party, One Nation, and Jon Stewart’s and Stephen Colbert’ s Rally to Restore Sanity. A month after the Wall Street … More

    Popular Vote or the Electoral College?

    While New Hampshire maneuvers to maintain first-in-the-nation primary status, a new Gallup poll reveals many Americans don’t care who New Hampshirites want to be President. In fact, they don’t care who any state wants to be President. A majority of those polled—62 percent—would prefer to amend the Constitution so that … More

    Constitutional Mythbusters

    What do the presidential candidates think about the Constitution? In a recent Wall Street Journal op-ed, Seth Lipsky proposed a televised debate for GOP presidential candidates to discuss their views on the Constitution. Sounds great! But if we are going to have a real conversation about the Constitution, let’s not … More

    Party Like It's 1787

    On September 17, 1787, delegates from each state signed the Constitution. At 224 years old, the Constitution is now the longest lasting, most imitated national constitution in the world. It unified the country during a time of tremendous instability by providing a stable national government over the 13 separate states. … More

    North Carolina brings the Founding Principles Back to School

    In 2010, North Carolina public school officials proposed changing the high school U.S. History course curriculum to cover events only from 1877 forward. Forget George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, the Constitution, and the Civil War—nothing meaningful happened in America before 1877. But, what a difference a year makes. Thanks to … More

    The Not-So-Revolutionary Nineteenth Amendment

    Thursday marks the 91st anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment. We often hear that the amendment gives women the right to vote. But that is not the case. Women were exercising the right to vote long before 1920. At the time of the Founding, women were voting in … More

    Morning Bell: Celebrating America's Enduring Principles

    America was born on July 4, 1776, with the passage of the Declaration of Independence. Today, as we celebrate our great country 235 years later, we reflect upon its meaning. The Declaration announced to the world that the American colonies were free and independent states. But this alone does not … More

    Happy Birthday Calvin Coolidge

    America’s birthday is also that of Calvin Coolidge, the only president born on the Fourth of July. Though best remembered as “Silent Cal,” Coolidge is one of the most eloquent defenders of America’s principles. And the Declaration of Independence received his highest praise: “If all men are created equal, that … More

    Did America Have a Christian Founding?

    Few historical questions generate as much controversy as this one—and do so on such a regular basis. Every few months or so, following some public pronouncement on America’s Christian roots or some court ruling pertaining to the First Amendment, the nation is subjected to a heated, but essentially sterile, debate … More