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  • Happy Mother’s Day, from All American Women

    It’s all too easy for each rising generation to fall into the trap of thinking that history started when it came of age. As the United States “celebrates” the 50th anniversary of Betty Friedan’s The Feminist Mystique, many people—even the great Warren Buffett—are acting as if this is the first … More

    PBS Constitutional Road Trip: Smooth Ride with a Few Bumps

    This week, PBS premiered part one of a four-part series on the Constitution. In it, Peter Sagal, host of NPR’s Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me, rode around America astride a decked-out flag motorcycle to investigate the Constitution in modern America. And the first leg of his journey was surprisingly good. … More

    Women’s Suffrage and America’s First Principles

    One hundred years ago this week, 5,000 women marched for women’s suffrage in Washington, D.C. The goal was to “give expression to the nation-wide demand for an amendment to the Constitution enfranchising women.” A few years after the parade, the 19th Amendment was ratified, which guaranteed that the right to … More

    Morning Bell: George Washington's Example on Religious Liberty

    Instead of celebrating George Washington’s birthday, today we’ve lumped him in together with no-names including Millard Fillmore and William Henry Harrison as we celebrate a generic “Presidents’ Day.” But George Washington was not simply a President. He was the indispensible man of the American Founding. Washington’s words, thoughts, and deeds … More

    Frederick Douglass: America’s Valentine

    Valentine’s Day is the perfect day to eat chocolate or dote on freshly delivered red roses. Oh, and to celebrate the 19th-century abolitionist Frederick Douglass. Born into slavery on Maryland’s Eastern Shore in February 1818, Douglass was given the improbably dignified name “Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey.” Like many people born … More

    The Legend of Abraham Lincoln: Fact or Fiction?

    Representative Joe Courtney (D–CT) recently penned an open letter to the man who wrote the movie Lincoln. The film depicts a divided Connecticut state congressional delegation, with three members voting to uphold slavery. Courtney declares that cannot stand. He clarifies that, in 1865, Connecticut’s representatives voted unanimously to abolish slavery. … More

    Presidential Speeches Quiz: Who Said It?

    Barack Obama has compared himself to many Presidents. First he ran as Abraham Lincoln reincarnated. He even appealed to the spirit of Ronald Reagan. Then he tried to govern like Franklin D. Roosevelt (FDR). He campaigned for re-election as Harry Truman running against a “do-nothing” Congress. He’s been to Osawatomie, … More

    Will Obamacare Go the Way of Prohibition?

    Steve Benen on MSNBC’s “The Maddow Blog” dismisses congressional efforts to repeal all or parts of Obamacare and admonishes conservatives to get with the program. Why? He says Obamacare “is here to stay.” What makes Obamacare untouchable? Congress considers countless pieces of legislation “to amend” this legislation or that statute. … More

    2012 Year in Review: A Wild Year for Conservatism

    By now you’ve probably seen the TV specials and glossy magazines reviewing major highlights of the past year. There are still a few days left before we close the books on 2012 (and action appears likely on the fiscal cliff). But in the meantime, let’s recap some of the good … More

    Lincoln: The Movie, the Man

    Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln debuts in Washington, D.C., this week. It features a stellar cast: Tommy Lee Jones, David Strathairn, Sally Field, and Daniel Day-Lewis as our nation’s 16th President. Day-Lewis is known for method acting. But which Lincoln will he portray? Will he play into the liberal myth of Lincoln … More