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  • Immigration: Senate’s Amnesty Would Cost Trillions

    In 2007, The Heritage Foundation estimated that amnesty would cost the U.S. taxpayer trillions of dollars over the lifetimes of the immigrants who are legalized. We will soon release an updated analysis. It is a resounding rebuttal to the claim from amnesty supporters that a long waiting period between the … More

    Amnesty Supporters Wrong about Poverty Exclusion

    In 2007, The Heritage Foundation estimated that the fiscal cost of amnesty to the U.S. taxpayer would total trillions over the lifetimes of the immigrants who are legalized. We are updating that study and will release new numbers soon. The new analysis assumes that almost all unlawful immigrants living in … More

    Academy of Pediatrics Endorses Same-Sex Marriage, but Science Not So Sure

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released a policy statement yesterday indicating its support for same-sex marriage. Based on “extensive research,” this statement from a scientific organization may seem authoritative. In reality, however, the AAP’s position is based on ideology, not science. The AAP claims that children “receive similar parenting … More

    Federal Pay and the Ryan Budget: Brazen Falsehoods from a Federal Employee Union

    Congressman Paul Ryan’s (R–WI) budget outline calls for federal employees to contribute more to their pensions, but the American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE) is none too happy about it. In noting that total federal employee compensation is currently excessive, Ryan is on solid empirical ground. But instead of trying … More

    "Overpaid and Underworked" Federal Employees? It's Not Just a "Perception"

    The Washington Post has a sympathetic article today on federal workers who consider themselves unfair victims of the sequester. Unfortunately, the article does not consider data and evidence, instead characterizing criticism of federal worker compensation as mere assertion, jealous emotionalism, or politicking. Federal employees are upset about “perceptions” of government … More

    Head Start: Reporters Need to Ask the White House the Obvious Question

    A rigorous and large-scale experimental evaluation, conducted by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), finds that the federal Head Start program has essentially no lasting cognitive or behavioral benefits. The results clearly call into question the federal government’s $8 billion per year commitment to the program. Far from … More

    Large Supply of Elementary Teachers Waiting to Be “Underpaid”

    The supply of elementary school teachers greatly exceeds the demand for them among public-school districts, according to data collected by Education Week. This fact has a number of implications for education policy, but one of them—not directly mentioned in the article—stands out: If elementary-school teachers are truly “underpaid,” as teacher … More

    Responses to Union Suggestion of a Teacher "Bar Exam"

    Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT), proposed a “bar exam” for public-school teachers in a Wall Street Journal op-ed last week. Modeled after the bar exam for aspiring lawyers, the new test would be intended to produce highly effective teachers. But it would do nothing of … More

    Even Government Employees Think Private Sector Works Harder

    The polling firm Rasmussen offers some interesting data on the work effort of government employees compared to private-sector workers. In five separate surveys this past year, Rasmussen asked a representative sample of American adults, “Who works harder?” The choices were government workers, private-sector employees, and “not sure.” The table below … More

    Immigration "Diversity Lottery" Is Long Overdue for Abolition

    The House passed a bill on Friday that would abolish the immigrant “diversity lottery” and replace it with a new program that would give green cards (permanent legal residency) to certain foreign-born science and technology graduates of U.S. schools. An unwise policy since its inception in 1986, the diversity lottery—the … More