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  • Iran Nuclear Ambitions Remain Unchanged Despite New “Moderate” President

    Last week, White House press secretary Jay Carney said that Hassan Rowhani’s election as Iranian president represents “a call by the Iranian people for change” and “an opportunity for Iran to act quickly to resolve the international community’s deep concerns over Iran’s nuclear program.” Nevertheless, this may prove to be … More

    Why Ignoring Russian Arms Cheating Leaves the United States Vulnerable

    The Obama Administration appears to be ignoring Russian violations of arms control agreements in favor of securing future agreements, which will eventually leave the United States vulnerable to Russia’s growing intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) capabilities. In a recent article, Mark Schneider of the National Institute for Public Policy points out … More

    The Case for Strengthening the GMD Program

    Following the failure of the July 5 intercept test of the Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) missile defense system, Senator Dick Durbin (D–IL) commented that “this is a system that still hasn’t been proven to be able to protect America.” Durbin added that he does not see the value in allocating … More

    What’s More Dangerous—a Sharknado or an EMP Attack?

    The SyFy channel’s newest original movie, Sharknado, took social media by storm earlier this month and continues to gain traction (a sequel is in the works). The tagline of the movie reads simply, “Enough Said!” because there is not much else to say about a hurricane causing tornadoes full of … More

    Reduced Nuclear Arms: Slimmer, but Not Smarter

    Would reducing U.S. nuclear arms save taxpayers money? Former Pentagon policy official David J. Trachtenberg responded to Stimson Center co-founder Barry Blechman’s piece arguing that it would. Trachtenberg points out that the money saved by reducing the nuclear stockpile is “negligible compared to the costs of building up [the] conventional … More

    Russia Compliance Problem: How Obama's Policy Is Failing

    In a recent article, Mark Schneider of the National Institute for Public Policy points out that Russia’s compliance issues with arms control treaties have worsened under Vladimir Putin. In 2007, Russia tested a multiple-warhead version of the SS-27 Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) despite a Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) provision … More

    Russia’s Advantage: No Reason to Follow Obama’s Lead in Nuclear Arms Reductions

    After President Obama made another pledge to reduce nuclear arms in Berlin last week, the underlying message seems to be that, if the United States continues marching down the road toward nuclear zero, other nuclear nations such as Russia will follow suit. Ironically, this policy depends on American influence while … More

    Nuclear Reduction Plan Based on Assumptions, Not Reality

    President Obama’s speech in Berlin included a nuclear reduction pledge that is based on poor assumptions and an unrealistic goal. It is a policy that will leave the U.S. weaker as Russia continues its strategic arms buildup. Former Senator Jon Kyl (R–AZ) points out in a recent op-ed that Obama … More

    Nuclear Weapons: The Case for a Robust Force

    President Obama announced yesterday during a speech in Berlin that “peace with justice means pursuing the security of a world without nuclear weapons, no matter how distant that dream may be.” However, it is the “dream,” not the distance, that is the issue. The case for nuclear reduction sounds good … More

    Senator Levin Is Wrong: U.S. Needs East Coast Missile Defense Site

    Senator Carl Levin (D-MI), Chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee (SASC), recently concluded that there is “no validated military requirement” for a proposed East Coast missile defense site. While some military leaders agree with his conclusion, the fact remains that the East Coast is less protected than the West … More