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  • Iranian Earthquake Victims Blame Their Own Government

    The fracture between Iran’s autocratic government and its people is growing ever wider in the aftermath of the two earthquakes that hit northern Iran last weekend. Tehran’s inadequate response is drawing strong criticism from theAzerbaijan region ofIran, where 16,000 people are now homeless and the official count is now 306 … More

    Julian Assange's Sordid Ego Trip

    After hiding in the Ecuadorian embassy in London for two months, Julian Assange was granted asylum in Ecuador yesterday to avoid extradition to Sweden, where he is wanted on charges of two counts of sexual assault. Assange wanted to take on the mightiest government in the world by publicizing massive … More

    Red Tape Tangles Aid to Iranian Victims

    U.S. government red tape is preventing American Iranians from sending much-needed aid to the thousands of victims of Saturday’s two earthquakes in northern Iran, aid organizations say. The earthquake killed 300 people and injured thousands in northern Iran. Food and material aid are desperately needed, but aid organizations are telling … More

    Suffering Iranian People Need Humanitarian Help

    The two earthquakes that hit the northern Iranian town of Tabriz on Saturday—6.4 and 6.3 on the Richter scale—should prompt strong American support for the Iranian people. The contentious relationship between the government of Iran and the United States does not include the Iranian people. With more than 300 dead … More

    The New Public Diplomacy: The American Story Starts with Knowing Ourselves

    A newly published study by the American Security Project (ASP), “The New Public Diplomacy Imperative,” highlights public diplomacy (PD) as a crucial element of our national security strategy and details the many obstacles for U.S. public diplomacy to reach its potential. Over the past few decades, a new interest in … More

    Italian Prime Minister Warns of EU Collapse

    In an interview with Germany’s Der Spiegel magazine on Sunday, Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti warned of the “psychological break-up” of Europe if the euro crisis is not soon resolved. To which there is only one thing to say: The European Union has been a schizophrenic construct from the very … More

    Tweeting: An Olympic Sport?

    The London Olympics have been dubbed the “social media Olympics.” Again, social media find their way into the big story of the day, but keeping perspective is important. Only a fraction of Internet users spend much time on Twitter (8 percent), and the virtual world pales in comparison with real … More

    Public Diplomacy Mission: Defining America as a Resilient Nation Built on Individual Dreams

    In a recent speech to the American Security Project, Tara Sonenshine, Undersecretary of State for Public Diplomacy, laid out her vision for her tenure in office. “I always begin with, well, what is this nation about?” she said. Most people hesitate to go there, presumably for fear of offending this … More

    The White House Attack Machine Backfires

    If ever a political assault on the media misfired, it has to be the appalling attack last Friday by White House communications director Dan Pfeiffer in the White House blog on Charles Krauthammer, one of Washington’s most highly respected newspaper columnists. Pfeiffer chastised Krauthammer scathingly for misstating the fact that … More

    Americans Deserve to Know What the U.S. Government Is Broadcasting

    Americans deserve transparency about what their government is doing, as long as that transparency doesn’t threaten national security. Transparency should also be the guiding principle of the State Department’s public diplomacy and U.S. international broadcasting. But since 1948, the U.S. Information and Educational Exchange Act, also know as the Smith–Mundt … More