• The Heritage Network
    • Resize:
    • A
    • A
    • A
  • Donate
  • Enforcing Election Integrity in Mississippi

    The American Civil Rights Union’s (ACRU) Election Integrity Defense Project last Friday sued two Mississippi counties that have more registered voters than voting-eligible citizens. The ACRU, headed by former Ohio Secretary of State Kenneth Blackwell and former Attorney General Edwin Meese, claims that the counties are not complying with Section … More

    Keeping Judges Out of the Foreign Policy Arena

    This week, the Supreme Court issued a historic decision that will help prevent U.S. courts (and activist judges) from interfering in foreign policy issues that are—and should be—the constitutional prerogative of the executive and legislative branches. Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum involved the Alien Tort Statute (ATS), which was passed … More

    Behind Closed Doors: The Kentucky Wiretap

    The latest news report on the surreptitious recording of a strategy session in the Kentucky campaign headquarters of Senator Mitch McConnell (R) indicates that federal and state law may indeed have been violated. The local NPR station in Louisville claims that two members of Progress Kentucky recorded the meeting from … More

    Another Supreme Chance to Ban Discrimination

    On Monday, the Supreme Court agreed to review an important case on race and sex discrimination (also known as affirmative action) that will give it another chance to overturn a court of appeals ruling and confirm that discrimination is always wrong. Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action is an … More

    Supreme Court Strikes a Blow to State Court Bias

    In a unanimous opinion yesterday by Justice Stephen Breyer in Standard Fire Ins. Co. v. Knowles, the Supreme Court concluded that plaintiffs’ attorneys can’t evade federal law on class action lawsuits through a self-serving stipulation designed to keep a case in state court and out of the federal system. Like … More

    Racially Charged Attacks Against Justice Scalia Unfounded

    The inflammatory attacks on Justice Antonin Scalia after the oral arguments in the Supreme Court in the Shelby County case last week show the desperation of the supporters of the “racial entitlement” that is Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act. Those attacks, and some of the disgusting political cartoons … More

    Inside the Supreme Court: Arguments on the Voting Rights Act

    In the midst of a large rally and protest on the steps of the Supreme Court building this morning, the Justices sharply questioned both sides in Shelby County, Alabama vs. Holder. This is the case challenging the continued constitutionality of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, an emergency provision … More

    Jesse Jackson Jr. and Wife Plead Guilty

    The tale of financial wrongdoing by former Representative Jesse Jackson, Jr. (D–IL) and his wife and former campaign manager, Sandra Jackson, continued today when they both pled guilty in a Washington, D.C. courtroom to criminal violations of federal law. Jackson pled guilty this morning to one conspiracy count of filing … More

    Long Lines to Vote? Not for the Vast Majority of Americans

    It certainly is heartwarming that Desiline Victor, the 102-year-old voter whom President Obama recognized in his State of the Union speech, continues to vote and take part in our democratic process. We wish that more Americans had her sense of civic duty. The President announced a “nonpartisan” commission led by … More

    We Already Have an Election Commission—And Obama Has Ignored It

    President Obama talked about voting rights in the State of the Union address, claiming we are “betraying our ideals” when any American has to “wait for five, six, seven hours just to cast their ballot.” He announced a “nonpartisan commission to improve the voting experience in America.” While there may … More