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  • Preview of Next Supreme Court Term

    Monday, October 7, marks the beginning of the Supreme Court’s next term. The last term included a number of high-profile cases involving voting rights, same-sex marriage, drug-sniffing dogs, and racial preferences in college admissions. So what is on deck for this next term? There are a number of cases already … More

    Morning Bell: 5 Ways Obama Has Trampled the Constitution

    Today, the Constitution turns 226 years old. Let’s not forget it states that the President “shall take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed.” The Obama Administration has done the opposite, turning the law on its head and ignoring constitutional limitations on its power. >>> Read the Constitution now Here … More

    From the Horse’s Mouth: D.C. Circuit Doesn’t Need More Judges

    At a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing to consider the nomination of Cornelia “Nina” Pillard, Senator Chuck Grassley (R–IA) questioned whether the Senate should confirm any additional judges to the D.C. Circuit. Putting aside serious concerns about Pillard’s radical positions on sex education, abortion, and religious liberty, Republicans and Democrats have … More

    Third Time’s a Charm? Another Federal Appellate Court Smacks Down Obama Recess Appointments

    This week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit invalidated the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) unfair labor practice decisions against two companies based on President Obama’s illegal recess appointments in violation of the Recess Appointments Clause. This is the third appellate court to consider the issue—and President … More

    Public Opinion and the Supreme Court

    A recent Rasmussen poll shows that public approval of the Supreme Court of the United States is at an all-time low. Only 28 percent of those surveyed gave the Supreme Court a “good” or “excellent” rating, while the justices’ “poor” rating has risen to 30 percent. This negative rating is … More

    California Marriage Case: It’s Not Over Yet

    On Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its ruling in Hollingsworth v. Perry, finding that the official proponents of California’s Proposition 8 (which defined marriage as the union of one man and one woman) lacked standing to defend the law in court. Throwing out the federal appellate court’s decision, the … More

    Supreme Court to Congress on Voting Rights Act: “History Did Not End in 1965”

    In its Voting Rights Act decision today, the Supreme Court struck down an outdated provision that was no longer necessary—because thankfully, “Our country has changed,” as Chief Justice John Roberts put it. The decision did not invalidate the entire Voting Rights Act, and it will not promote discrimination. In fact, … More

    Fisher v. University of Texas: Racial Preferences at the Supreme Court

    Today, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its long-awaited decision in the challenge to the University of Texas’s consideration of race in its undergraduate admissions program. The ruling is a limited win for those who want a truly colorblind society. Texas adopted a plan in the mid-1990s that automatically admitted Texas … More

    National Labor Relations Board Smacked Down in Court Once Again

    This week, a federal appellate court struck down the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) “poster rule,” finding that the agency does not have the authority to issue such a rule. The poster rule requires more than 6 million employers to post notices at work informing employees of their rights under … More

    Another Obama Recess Appointment Smacked Down

    Today, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit vacated a decision of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) on the basis that board member Craig Becker had been appointed in violation of the Constitution. In a 2–1 decision, Judge D. Brooks Smith determined that Becker’s appointment on March … More