• The Heritage Network
    • Resize:
    • A
    • A
    • A
  • Donate
  • Latest in the IRS Targeting Saga

    Today the House Oversight and Governmental Reform Committee approved a resolution to hold former senior IRS official Lois Lerner in contempt of Congress for refusing to answer questions about her involvement in the IRS’s targeting of conservative groups. This comes on the heels of Rep. Darrell Issa (R–Calif.), Chairman of … More

    Washington Post Gets the Numbers Wrong on Judicial Nominees

    The Washington Post claims that the confirmation of President Obama’s judicial nominees might “get relatively close to Bush’s eight-year total”—if the Senate continues confirming them at the current rate. But comparing Obama’s nominations in just 5 years and change with all eight years of Bush’s administration is misleading. President Obama’s … More

    Texas Abortion Case Heading for Supreme Court

    A 3-judge panel of the Fifth Circuit has upheld H.B. 2, Texas’s abortion law made famous by state senator Wendy Davis’s eleven-hour filibuster last summer. Planned Parenthood and other abortion providers challenged parts of the law that would require doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a hospital … More

    How the Supreme Court Justices Reacted to Today's Hobby Lobby Arguments

    President Obama’s health care law made its way back to the Supreme Court of the United States today. In addition to being unsound health care policy by limiting patient choice and increasing costs, it also requires businesses to pay for abortion-inducing drugs. This morning, the Supreme Court heard oral argument … More

    Challenge to Colorado TABOR Flouts Supreme Court Precedents

    A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit held that Colorado legislators have standing to challenge the state’s Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR) because it limits their ability to vote on tax proposals. The court also rejected the state’s argument that only Congress—not the federal … More

    First Filibusters, Now Blue Slips: A New Fight over Judicial Nominations

    Senate Democrats triggered the “nuclear option” to effectively eliminate the filibuster for executive and judicial nominations last year. Now another Senate tradition may be next up on the chopping block: the use of “blue slips.” Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Patrick Leahy (D–VT) stated, “As long as the blue-slip process is … More

    Should a State Be Able to Force People to Join a Union?

      Can a state force you to join a labor union? On Tuesday, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in Harris v. Quinn, a challenge to Illinois’s authority to force home-care providers who receive state subsidies to join labor unions against their will.   Under the Illinois Disabilities Program, the … More

    Free Speech and the Abortion Distortion

    Today, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in McCullen v. Coakley, in which Eleanor McCullen is challenging a Massachusetts law that prevents her from peacefully talking to women on public sidewalks outside abortion clinics about their options. The right to speak your mind—even about unpopular topics—is a core freedom upon … More

    Polygamy, Sister Wives, and the Slippery Slope

    Late last week, a federal judge in Utah struck down part of the state’s law that criminalizes polygamy. The challenge was brought by Kody Brown of the television show Sister Wives. Brown is a polygamist who has one legal wife and three other wives by “spiritual union” based on their … More

    Filibuster or Not, the D.C. Circuit Still Doesn’t Need More Judges

    Today the Senate is scheduled to vote on the nomination of Patricia Millett to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. Now that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D–NV) successfully deployed the “nuclear option” to eliminate Senate Republicans’ ability to filibuster appellate and district court nominees, he can … More