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  • Politics and a New Trade Bureaucracy

    President Obama just announced plans to borrow millions of dollars from countries likeChinato create a new federal bureaucracy tasked with policing the trade practices of countries likeChina. The new bureaucracy is more about politics than trade. The International Trade Enforcement Center (ITEC) will have as many as 60 employees. With … More

    Our Debt and China

    Yesterday, the Department of the Treasury released an initial estimate of foreign holdings of U.S. securities, including Treasury bonds, as of June 30, 2011. This estimate serves as a correction of monthly figures Treasury publishes, known as the Major Foreign Holders series. There are three implications of the new data … More

    Market Reform in China: Should We Believe It?

    The first step in solving a problem is admitting it. For years, the Chinese government and their defenders overseas insisted first that China was still reforming, then that state-led economic development was superior to market-led development. Evidence to the contrary came as news to many. There has always been a … More

    Some Truths About Trade

    In 2004, the yuan ended the year 8.28 to the dollar. In 2011, it ended the year 6.31 to the dollar, a 24-percent rise. In 2004, America’s trade deficit with China was $162 billion; in 2011, it was $295 billion. Those demanding a 30 percent appreciation got most of it—and … More

    Chinese Statistics: Start with Skepticism

    When the Chinese government is the sole source of information, how much of it should be believed? In terms of economic performance, not that much. The Wall Street Journal’s Tom Orlik, author of a book on the subject, challenges those skeptical of Chinese numbers to make a better case. Challenge … More

    Global Economics: When China Is Not Just China

    The People’s Republic of China’s (PRC’s) relationship with Iran receives a good deal of attention. As the U.S. considers how to stop Iran’s nuclear weapons program short of military action, the PRC is considered vital in ensuring economic sanctions are effective. But it has been difficult to win Chinese cooperation … More

    Dealing with China-U.S. Tariff Law

    A federal court this week barred the simultaneous application of anti-dumping and countervailing duties to imports from China, a practice begun by the Department of Commerce in 2007. Commerce has rightly classified China a “non-market economy” for purposes of applying anti-dumping duties against goods sold in the U.S. at below-market … More

    Huntsman Visit and a U.S.-Taiwan FTA

    Former Governor Jon Huntsman (R–UT) was at The Heritage Foundation this week answering policy questions. In his talk, he emphasized budget discipline, tax reform, and education. He also made a powerful argument for free trade, stressing that we have vastly underused our international options in helping address economic challenges. There … More

    There is Something Missing From India FDI Debate

    A beleaguered Indian federal government tried last week to break out of its rut and boost what is finally recognized as a struggling Indian economy. It did so with a bold and valuable decision to expand foreign participation in retail. Foreign companies will be able to wholly own single-brand stores … More

    DEBATE PREP: What if China Changes?

    The political debate over China seems familiar because they’ve been on the political table for years.  Is China taking American jobs?  How cooperative is the People’s Republic of China (PRC) on issues like nuclear programs in North Korea and Iran?  China rises; America frets, and Presidential candidates talk about roughly the … More