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  • Over DOJ Objections, Parents Allowed to Intervene in Louisiana School Choice Case

    Last week, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit overturned a federal district court ruling in a victory for school choice in Louisiana. As we’ve written before, the Department of Justice (DOJ) has been particularly hostile to Louisiana’s school choice program. So hostile, in fact, that last … More

    Court Orders Louisiana to Put Feds Before Families in Voucher Notifications

    The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) hasn’t succeeded in stopping Louisiana’s statewide voucher program, so now it’s trying to bury it in paperwork. Last August, DOJ tried to use a 40-year-old desegregation court order, Brumfield v. Dodd, to block Louisiana’s school voucher program from continuing to operate—despite the fact that … More

    Second Circuit Rules Against Religious Freedom of NYC Churches

    In the latest episode of a nearly 20-year legal battle for religious freedom in New York City, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals yesterday upheld the Board of Education of the City of New York’s refusal to provide permits to use public school space for worship services after hours and … More

    Civil Asset Forfeiture: The Biggest Little Racket in Nevada

    It was highway robbery, but they called it civil asset forfeiture. On the last day of his 2,400-mile drive to start a new life on the West Coast, Matt Lee found himself on the side of the road, his belongings combed through, and drug dogs sniffing his car. Why? Because … More

    This Court Case Could Knock Out One of the Most Important Parts of Obamacare

    While media attention is focused on the Hobby Lobby case before the Supreme Court, there is another important Obamacare case being heard today before the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Federal courts don’t just issue decisions on constitutional grounds. They also interpret and apply … More

    Seattle’s Rideshare Caps Will Squash Innovators Such as Uber

    Seattle has earned the dubious honor of being the first city to cap the number of drivers that rideshare services such as Uber may keep on the road. Uber and companies like it represent a new type of cab ride for a new generation of smartphone-equipped riders, using apps and … More

    Heritage Scholar a Threat to Safety on Stanford Campus? Stanford’s Acting Unlawfully.

    Ryan T. Anderson talks a lot about marriage. Heritage’s William E. Simon fellow has even been on CNN talking about marriage. But apparently safe enough for a CNN studio and dozens of other college campuses isn’t safe enough for Stanford University, because the Stanford University Graduate Student Council (GSC) has … More

    DOJ Report Uncovers $15,624 in Questionable Police Expenditures

    A recent Department of Justice (DOJ) inspector general’s audit of the Lansing, Michigan, police department questioned $15,624 in expenditures from 2009 to 2012. The money wound up in Lansing by way of the DOJ’s equitable sharing program, a cooperative civil forfeiture program designed “to enhance cooperation among federal, state, and … More

    Georgia Fails to Pass Civil Forfeiture Reform

    Civil forfeiture has gained prominence as a tool to combat the drug trade; however, its targets can be as mundane as motorists or as industrious as independent grocers. Civil forfeiture abuse is a real problem, and many states are considering reforming these laws to protect innocent people who too often … More

    Federal Court Upholds School Ban on American Flag T-Shirts

    Yesterday, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit upheld a California high school’s prohibition on American flag t-shirts on Cinco de Mayo. The case is Dariano v. Morgan Hill Unified School District, and while it might get the law right, it certainly highlights a worrying trend in … More